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Damage Control Ophthalmology: Emergency Department Considerations

  • Ronnie K. Ren
  • Daniel J. Dire
Chapter

Abstract

The majority of modern combat ophthalmic injuries are associated with concomitant non-ocular life-threatening injuries. Often the initial eye examination is performed in the operating room after surgical stabilization.

Keywords

Damage control Combat ophthalmic injuries 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronnie K. Ren
    • 1
  • Daniel J. Dire
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Emergency MedicineUniversity of Texas Health Sciences Center – San AntonioSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Army, Office of the Surgeon GeneralFalls ChurchUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Pediatrics and Emergency MedicineUniversity of Texas Health Sciences Center – San AntonioSan AntonioUSA

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