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English in a Mongolian Ethnic Minority Primary School

  • Yayuan YiEmail author
  • Bob Adamson
Chapter
Part of the Multilingual Education Yearbook book series (MEYB)

Abstract

Primary schools in regional China with large ethnic minority populations are confronting the challenges of policies concerning multilingual education, comprising the minority language, Mandarin Chinese, and a foreign language, usually English from Year 3 (Adamson & Yi, China’s English: A history of English in Chinese education, Hong Kong, Hong Kong University Press, 2015). English, which is selected for its significance as an international language, is different from both Chinese and Mongolian in its writing system as well as its linguistic features. This chapter analyses the role and nature of English in the curriculum of a Mongolian minority primary school in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (IMAR). It focuses on three aspects: policy decisions at the state and provincial levels, the views and arrangements of the school leaders, and the pedagogical decisions made by teachers in the classroom, with a particular focus on the medium of instruction. In addition, the relationship between English and the other two languages is discussed in terms of models of trilingual education.

Keywords

English as a foreign language Trilingual education Mongolian ethnic school Chinese education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Education University of Hong KongTai PoHong Kong

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