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Newer Political Systems Yielding Valuable Insights Concerning Consociation: South Africa and Northern Ireland

  • Brighid Brooks Kelly
Chapter

Abstract

In the 1990s, consociational components were implemented in South Africa and Northern Ireland. Although elements of consociation were introduced in South Africa’s 1994 interim constitution, most were not maintained in the country’s 1997 constitution and a majoritarian system emerged which is dominated by one political party. South Africa’s experience implies valuable insights regarding closed list proportional representation and the potential advisability of designing consociational governance mechanisms so they can gradually become more centripetal. Northern Ireland’s recent history illustrates that consociation’s success seems facilitated by the single transferable vote proportional representation system. Comparison of these countries’ political systems since the 1990s also suggests a close connection between the nature of groups’ political demands and their expectations regarding likely external intervention.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brighid Brooks Kelly
    • 1
  1. 1.Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of DemocracyUniversity of PennsylvaniaSwarthmoreUSA

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