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Social Theory and Cultural Trauma

  • Ron EyermanEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cultural Sociology book series (CULTSOC)

Abstract

In this chapter, I use the example of three significant social theory texts, Horkheimer and Adorno’s Dialectic of Enlightenment, Freud’s Moses and Monotheism, and Bauman’s Modernity and the Holocaust in order to illustrate the difference between personal-, collective-, and cultural trauma. I also illustrate how personal trauma can impact the construction and representation of social theory.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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