Advertisement

That I Cannot Conceive of After the Results of Your Dissertation: Fritz Reiche and the F-sum Rule

  • Martin Jähnert
Chapter
Part of the Archimedes book series (ARIM, volume 56)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the work of Fritz Reiche on the quantum theory of radiation and his application of the correspondence principle in the context of dispersion theory. Following his private correspondence with Kramers in 1923 and 1924, I reconstruct Reiche’s attempts to determine transition probabilities on the basis of the correspondence principle and show how they led to the formulation of a relation among transition probabilities, which came to be known as the f-sum rule or the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule.

References

  1. Assmus, Alexi J. 1993. The Creation of Postdoctoral Fellowships and the Siting of American Scientific Research. Minerva 31: 151–183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bederson, Benjamin. 2005. Fritz Reiche and the Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars. Physics in Perspective 7: 453–472.ADSMathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Darrigol, Olivier. 1992. From “C”-Numbers to “Q”-Numbers: The Classical Analogy in the History of Quantum Theory. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  4. Dresden, Max. 1987. H.A. Kramers Between Tradition and Revolution. Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Duncan, Anthony, and Michel Janssen. 2007a. On the Verge of Umdeutung in Minnesota: Van Vleck and the Correspondence Principle. Part I. Archive for History of Exact Sciences 61: 553–624.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Duncan, Anthony, and Michel Janssen. 2007b. On the Verge of Umdeutung in Minnesota: Van Vleck and the Correspondence Principle. Part II. Archive for History of Exact Sciences 61: 625–671.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Einstein, Albert. 1916. Strahlungs-Emission und -Absorption nach der Quantentheorie. Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft, Verhandlungen 18: 318–323.ADSGoogle Scholar
  8. Fues, Erwin. 1922a. Die Berechnung wasserstoffunähnlicher Spektren aus Zentralbewegungen der Elektronen I. Zeitschrift für Physik 11: 364–378.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Fues, Erwin. 1922b. Die Berechnung wasserstoffunähnlicher Spektren aus Zentralbewegungen der Elektronen II. Zeitschrift für Physik 12: 1–12.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gearhart, Clayton A. 2010. “Astonishing Successes” and “Bitter Disappointment”: The Specific Heat of Hydrogen in Quantum Theory. Archive for History of Exact Sciences 64: 113–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gearhart, Clayton A. 2012. Fritz Reiche’s 1921 Quantum Theory Textbook. In Research and Pedagogy: A History of Quantum Physics through Its Textbooks. Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge Studies, ed. Massimiliano Badino and Jaume Navarro, vol. 2, 101–116. Berlin: Edition Open Access.Google Scholar
  12. Jammer, Max. 1966. The Conceptual Development of Quantum Mechanics. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  13. Jordi Taltavull, Marta. 2013. Challenging the Boundaries between Classical and Quantum Physics: The Case of Optical Dispersion. In Traditions and Transformations in the History of Quantum Physics HQ–3: Third International Conference on the History of Quantum Physics, Berlin, 28 June–2 July 2010. Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge Proceedings, ed. Shaul Katzir, Christoph Lehner, and Jürgen Renn, vol. 5, 29–59. Berlin: Edition Open Access.Google Scholar
  14. Kemble, Edwin C. 1924. Quantization in Space and the Relative Intensities of the Components of Infra-Red Absorption Bands. Proceeding National Academy of Sciences 10: 274–279.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kemble, Edwin C. 1925a. The Application of the Correspondence Principle to Degenerate Systems and the Relative Intensities of Band Lines. Physical Review 25: 1–22.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kemble, Edwin C. 1925b. Über die Intensität der Bandenlinien. Zeitschrift für Physik 35: 286–292.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Konno, Hiroyuki. 1993. Kramers’ Negative Dispersion, the Virtual Oscillator Model, and the Correspondence Principle. Centaurus 36: 117–166.MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Kramers, Hendrik A. 1924a. The Law of Dispersion and Bohr’s Theory of Spectra. Nature 133: 673–676.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Kramers, Hendrik A. 1924b. The Quantum Theory of Dispersion. Nature 114: 310–311.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Ladenburg, Rudolf. 1921. Die quantentheoretische Deutung der Zahl der Dispersionselektronen. Zeitschrift für Physik 4: 451–468.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Ladenburg, Rudolf, and Fritz Reiche. 1923. Absorption, Zerstreuung und Dispersion in der Bohrschen Atomtheorie. Die Naturwissenschaften 11: 584–598.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Ladenburg, Rudolf, and Fritz Reiche. 1924. Dispersionsgesetz und Bohrsche Atomtheorie. Die Naturwissenschaften 12: 672–673.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Planck, Max. 1921. Vorlesungen über die Theorie der Wärmestrahlung, 4th ed. Leipzig: Johann Ambrosius Barth.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  24. Rademacher, Hans, and Fritz Reiche. 1927. Die Quantelung des symmetrischen Kreisels nach Schrödingers Undulationsmechanik. Intensitätsfragen. Zeitschrift für Physik 41: 453–492.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Reiche, Fritz. 1926a. Die Quantelung des symmetrischen Kreisels nach Schrödingers Undulationsmechanik. Zeitschrift für Physik 39: 444–464.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Reiche, Fritz. 1926b. Über Beziehungen zwischen den Übergangswahrscheinlichkeiten beim Zeemaneffekt (magnetischer f-Summensatz). Die Naturwissenschaften 14: 275–276.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Reiche, Fritz. 1929. Zur quantenmechanischen Dispersionsformel des atomaren Wasserstoffs im Grundzustand. Zeitschrift für Physik 53: 168–191.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Reiche, Fritz, and Willy Thomas. 1925. Über die Zahl der Dispersionselektronen, die einem stationären Zustand zugeordnet sind. Zeitschrift für Physik 31: 510–525.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Slater, John C. 1975. Solid State and Molecular Theory: A Scientific Biography. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  30. Stark, Johannes. 1916. Beobachtungen über den zeitlichen Verlauf der Lichtemission in Spektralserien. Annalen der Physik 49: 731–768.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Thomas, Willy. 1924. Näherungsweise Berechnung der Bahnen und Übergangswahrscheinlichkeiten des Serienelektrons im Natriumatom. Zeitschrift für Physik 24: 169–196.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Thomas, Willy. 1925. Über die Zahl der Dispersionselektronen, die einem stationären Zustand zugeordnet sind. Vorläufige Mitteilung. Die Naturwissenschaften 12: 627.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. van der Waerden, Bartel Leendert. 1968. Introduction Part I. Towards Quantum Mechanics. In Sources of Quantum Mechanics, ed. Bartel Leendert van der Waerden, 1–18. New York: Dover.Google Scholar
  34. Van Vleck, John H. 1924b. The Absorption of Radiation by Multiply Periodic Orbits, and Its Relation to the Correspondence Principle and the Rayleigh-Jeans Law: Part II. Calculation of Absorption of Multiply Periodic Orbits. Physical Review 24: 347–365.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Van Vleck, John H. 1926. Quantum Principles and Line Spectra. Bulletin of the National Research Council 10, Part 4. Washington, DC: National Research Council.Google Scholar
  36. Wehefritz, Valentin. 2002. Verwehte Spuren. Prof. Dr. phil Fritz Reiche. Universität im Exil, vol. 5. Dortmund: Universitätsbibliothek Dortmund.Google Scholar
  37. Wien, Wilhelm. 1919. Über Messungen der Leuchtdauer der Atome und der Dämpfung der Spektrallinien. I. Annalen der Physik 60: 597–639.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Wien, Wilhelm. 1921. Über Messungen der Leuchtdauer der Atome und der Dämpfung der Spektrallinien. II. Annalen der Physik 66: 229–236.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Jähnert
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Philosophie, Literatur-, Wissenschafts- und Technikgeschichte Fachbereich Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Technische Universität BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Max Planck Institute for the History of ScienceBerlinGermany

Personalised recommendations