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Geochemical and Faunal Characterization in the Sediments off the Cuban North and Northwest Coast

  • Maickel ArmenterosEmail author
  • Patrick T. Schwing
  • Rebekka A. Larson
  • Misael Díaz-Asencio
  • Adrian Martínez-Suárez
  • Raúl Fernández-Garcés
  • David J. Hollander
  • Gregg R. Brooks
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a summary of the scientific knowledge about sediments and fauna in the margin of northwest Cuban shelf. Little scientific information is publicly available, and so much of what is discussed here is the result of the scientific expedition to the region in May 2017 on board the R/V Weatherbird II as part of the GoMRI consortium, C-IMAGE (see Foreword, this book). The goal was to set broad environmental baselines against which to evaluate the impacts of any potential future oil spill or other disturbance in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The chapter is organized in three parts: (1) overview of the geographical setting of Cuban margin of GoM; (2) sediment characterization including texture, composition, and geochronology of sediment cores; and (3) characterization of key bioindicators of oil impact: mollusks, meiofauna, and foraminifera.

Keywords

Baseline Sediments Geochemistry Mollusk Meiofauna Foraminifera Cuba 

Notes

Funding Information

This research was made possible by grants from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative through its consortia: The Center for the Integrated Modeling and Analysis of the Gulf Ecosystem (C-IMAGE). Data are publicly available through the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) at https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org. Digital Object Identification (DOIs) for the databases presented in this chapter: core photographs (10.7266/n7-3vmj-nk86), bulk density/porewater (10.7266/n7-4pg2-4755), sediment texture and composition (10.7266/n7-58a1-b761), short-lived radioisotope analyses (10.7266/n7-78ae-7m58), mollusks and meiofauna (10.7266/n7-88ne-3229), foraminifera (10.7266/n7-e90r-1v29), and stable isotopes (10.7266/n7-repn-q515).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maickel Armenteros
    • 1
    Email author
  • Patrick T. Schwing
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rebekka A. Larson
    • 3
  • Misael Díaz-Asencio
    • 4
    • 5
  • Adrian Martínez-Suárez
    • 1
  • Raúl Fernández-Garcés
    • 1
  • David J. Hollander
    • 2
  • Gregg R. Brooks
    • 3
  1. 1.Universidad de La Habana, Centro de Investigaciones MarinasHavanaCuba
  2. 2.University of South Florida, College of Marine ScienceSt. PetersburgUSA
  3. 3.Eckerd CollegeSt. PetersburgUSA
  4. 4.Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de EnsenadaEnsenadaMexico
  5. 5.Centro de Estudios Ambientales de CienfuegosCienfuegosCuba

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