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Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Bottom Sediments and Depositional Processes: A Baseline for Future Oil Spills

  • Gregg R. BrooksEmail author
  • Rebekka A. Larson
  • Patrick T. Schwing
  • Arne R. Diercks
  • Maickel Armenteros
  • Misael Diaz-Asencio
  • Adrian Martínez-Suárez
  • Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza
  • Ana C. Ruiz-Fernandez
  • Juan Carlos Herguera
  • Libia H. Pérez-Bernal
  • David J. Hollander
Chapter

Abstract

The deposition/accumulation of oil on the seafloor is heavily influenced by sediment/texture/composition and sedimentary processes/accumulation rates. The objective of this chapter is to provide a baseline of Gulf of Mexico sediment types and transport/depositional processes to help guide managers where oiled sediments may be expected to be deposited and potentially accumulate on the seafloor in the event of a future oil spill. Based solely on sediments/processes/accumulation rates, regions most vulnerable to oil deposition/accumulation include the deep eastern basin, followed by the western/southwestern basin, and north and west continental margins. The least vulnerable regions include the northwest Cuban shelf and the carbonate-dominated west Florida shelf and Campeche Bank. This is intended to be used as a general, “first cut” tool and does not consider local variations in sediments/processes.

Keywords

Sediments Geochronology Sedimentary processes 

Notes

Funding Information

This research was made possible by grants from the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative through its consortia: the Center for the Integrated Modeling and Analysis of the Gulf Ecosystem (C-IMAGE) and Deep Sea to Coast Connectivity in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (Deep-C). Data are publicly available through the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information & Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) at https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org (doi: [10.7266/N7FJ2F94, 10.7266/N7FJ2F94, 10.7266/N7610XTJ, 10.7266/n7-4pg2-4755, 10.7266/n7-58a1-b761, 10.7266/n7-78ae-7m58, 10.7266/n7-3vmj-nk86, 10.7266/n7-7bcg-yk08].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregg R. Brooks
    • 1
    Email author
  • Rebekka A. Larson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrick T. Schwing
    • 2
  • Arne R. Diercks
    • 3
  • Maickel Armenteros
    • 4
  • Misael Diaz-Asencio
    • 5
  • Adrian Martínez-Suárez
    • 4
  • Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza
    • 6
  • Ana C. Ruiz-Fernandez
    • 7
  • Juan Carlos Herguera
    • 5
  • Libia H. Pérez-Bernal
    • 7
  • David J. Hollander
    • 2
  1. 1.Eckerd College, Department of Marine ScienceSt. PetersburgUSA
  2. 2.University of South Florida, College of Marine ScienceSt. PetersburgUSA
  3. 3.University of Southern Mississippi, School of Ocean Science and EngineeringKilnUSA
  4. 4.Universidad de La Habana, Centro de Investigaciones MarinasHavanaCuba
  5. 5.Center for Research and Higher Education at Ensenada, CICESEEnsenadaMexico
  6. 6.Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Académica Procesos Oceánicos y Costeros, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y LimnologíaMexico CityMexico
  7. 7.Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y LimnologíaMazatlánMexico

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