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Georgian Azeris: Victims and Beneficiaries of Territorial Nationalism

  • Maxim Tabachnik
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the plight of Georgian Azeris. This ethnic minority stands out in the three countries not only by its sheer size but also due to the dead end that the breakup of the USSR pushed them into exacerbated by the contradictions between jus soli policies in Azerbaijan and Georgia, both intra lege and de facto. Their plight describes how the politics of territorial citizenship dramatically affect the lives of large groups of people. Moreover, the strengthening of jus soli in both countries remains this minority’s major hope in the task of the normalization of their situation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maxim Tabachnik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PoliticsUniversity of California, Santa CruzSanta CruzUSA

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