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Historical Review of “Building Block Approach” in Validation for Human Space Flight

  • Joel W. SillsJr.
  • Matthew S. Allen
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

The evolution of human spaceflight vehicles including launch vehicles continues to propose a perplexing conundrum in the structural dynamics field. Because of the size and weight of these vehicles, it becomes impossible to perform a ground based modal test that replicates all of the loading events of interest (i.e. liftoff, ascent, staging, etc.). As a result, human spaceflight programs have long relied on “building block approaches” to dynamic model updating and validation. Given the wide interpretation and definition of a “building block” approach to dynamic model validation, this paper reviews the state of art techniques used during the Saturn/Apollo and Space Shuttle dynamic test campaigns and contrasts them with the plans for the Space Launch System (SLS). Some of the lessons learned in each program are presented, in terms of how the building block approach was applied in developing models for stakeholders, using and updating analytical models, and use of other test result outside the dynamic tests.

Keywords

Building block approach Integrated system Element/component Scale model Ground vibration test Correlation 

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel W. SillsJr.
    • 1
  • Matthew S. Allen
    • 2
  1. 1.NASA Johnson Space CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Engineering PhysicsUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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