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The Garden

  • Ola Plonska
  • Younes Saramifar
Chapter

Abstract

The small-scale urban gardens in central Havana are more than merely the physical spaces. They maintain complex networks that represent political orientations. In this chapter we trace the networks of small-scale gardens through Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and show how the network is a Garden in itself. Acts, intentions, actions, thoughts and performances all constitute the Garden and generate subjectivities. Through our network-thinking, we distinguish ‘the Garden’ from ‘the garden as a confined space’. The Garden emerges from the network of all small gardens across Cuba. Moreover, it transcends the material and discusses ideological performativity. The network-thinking reveals how sustainable practices can evoke intimate experiences between humans and non-humans within the realm of everyday life and the blurred boundaries of nature and culture.

Keywords

Actor-Network Theory Non-humans Sustainability Subjectivity Network-thinking Action Intention Performativity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ola Plonska
    • 1
  • Younes Saramifar
    • 1
  1. 1.Vrije Universiteit AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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