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Metaphor and Metonymy in a Culture of Food and Feasting: A Study Based on Selected Ancient Greek Comedies

  • Waldemar SzeflińskiEmail author
  • Wojciech Wachowski
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

In general, this article aims at exploring a selected fragment of the Ancient Greek language, namely the metaphors and metonymies related to food and feasting to be found in Old Attic Comedy. More specifically, the aim of the present article is twofold. First, it is to show how food and feasting were indirectly referred to in Ancient Greece by means of metaphor and metonymy. Second, it aims at investigating how food and feasting were used to metaphorically and metonymically talk and, more importantly, think about other spheres of life. In other words, the article is to show how food and feasting were used in Ancient Greece as both sources and targets of metaphoric and metonymic operations. Bearing in mind the Cognitive Linguistic principle of the embodiment of language, in order to analyze the selected linguistic expressions, the authors of this article also shed some light on the culture and the way of thinking of Ancient Greeks, or figuratively speaking, as Goethe would have put it, the authors “go to the poet’s land”.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kazimierz Wielki UniversityBydgoszczPoland

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