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Characterization Methods for Chitosan-Based Nanomaterials

  • Ram Chandra Choudhary
  • Sarita Kumari
  • R. V. Kumaraswamy
  • Ajay Pal
  • Ramesh Raliya
  • Pratim Biswas
  • Vinod Saharan
Chapter
Part of the Nanotechnology in the Life Sciences book series (NALIS)

Abstract

Chitosan-based nanomaterials have shown rapid pace to occupy indispensable role in biological sciences due to their unique properties and functionalities distinct from bulk chitosan. This new family of nanomaterials is being developed for various applications like smart delivery of bioactive compounds, enhancing plant growth, boosting immune response, and controlling plant diseases. With an exponential growth in interest on these nanomaterials, development of measurement protocols for reliable, accurate, and consistent characterization is very important. With the advancement of characterization techniques, the physicochemical properties of chitosan-based nanomaterials such as size, shape, interactions among constituent components, surface charge, elemental composition, purity, crystallinity, surface morphology, and internal structure can be accurately determined. Further, newer analytical techniques allow the analysis of nanomaterials in their chemically unmodified and fully hydrated states. Characterization of nanomaterials provides progression in understanding, method optimization, and their applications with sustainability and accuracy. In this chapter, we have described some of the important characterization techniques for chitosan-based nanomaterials.

Keywords

Chitosan X-ray diffraction Cryo-SEM/TEM Dynamic light scattering Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ram Chandra Choudhary
    • 1
  • Sarita Kumari
    • 1
  • R. V. Kumaraswamy
    • 1
  • Ajay Pal
    • 2
  • Ramesh Raliya
    • 3
  • Pratim Biswas
    • 3
  • Vinod Saharan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Rajasthan College of AgricultureMaharana Pratap University of Agriculture and TechnologyUdaipurIndia
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, College of Basic Sciences and HumanitiesChaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural UniversityHisarIndia
  3. 3.Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical EngineeringWashington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA

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