Advertisement

Acetaminophen and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

  • Rishi Raj Agarwal
  • Rishi Gaiha
  • Geeta NagpalEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Readily available and generally well-tolerated, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) provide significant relief for a gamut of painful conditions in people all around the world. Few drugs in the history of medicine are recognized as essential to the treatment of pain and suffering, but NSAIDs have proven themselves to be such for thousands of years. In this chapter, we will review the mechanisms by which these drugs work, how these drugs are used, and what considerations must be made before administering these drugs.

Keywords

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Acetaminophen Cyclooxygenase Prostaglandin Thromboxane Platelet 

Recommended Reading

  1. 1.
    Buckley MM, Brogden RN. Ketorolac. A review of its pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic potential. Drugs. 1990;39:86–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Buvanendran A, Kroin JS, Berger RA, et al. Upregulation of prostaglandin E2 and interleukins in the central nervous system and peripheral tissue during and after surgery in humans. Anesthesiology. 2006;104:403–10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cashman JN. The mechanisms of action of NSAIDs in analgesia. Drugs. 1996;52(suppl 5):13–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;3:CD001548.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral naproxen and naproxen sodium for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;1:CD004234.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral etoricoxib for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;4:CD004309.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral celecoxib for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;3:CD004233.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Derry C, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral ibuprofen plus paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;6:CD010210.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Godal HC, Eika C, Dybdahl JH, et al. Aspirin and bleeding-time. Lancet. 1979;1:1236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Jouzeau JY, Terlain B, Abid A, et al. Cyclo-oxygenase isoenzymes. How recent findings affect thinking about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Drugs. 1997;53:563–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Laine L. Approaches to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in the high-risk patient. Gastroenterology. 2001;120:594–606.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    McGettigan P, Henry D. Cardiovascular risk and inhibition of cyclooxygenase: a systematic review of the observational studies of selective and nonselective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase 2. JAMA. 2006;296:1633–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sinatra RS, Jahr JS, Reynolds LW, et al. Efficacy and safety of single and repeated administration of 1 gram intravenous acetaminophen injection (paracetamol) for pain management after orthopedic surgery. Anesthesiology. 2005;102:822–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Toms L, Derry S, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Single dose oral paracetamol with codeine for postoperative pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;1:CD001547.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Wallace JL. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastroenteropathy: the second hundred years. Gastroenterology. 1997;112:1000–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyNorthwestern University, Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA

Personalised recommendations