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Digital Technologies in Heritage Conservation. Methods of Teaching and Learning This M.Sc. Degree, Unique in Germany

  • M. HessEmail author
  • C. Schlieder
  • A. Troi
  • O. Huth
  • M. Jagfeld
  • J. Hindmarch
  • A. Henrich
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 919)

Abstract

A new master’s degree commenced in 2017 at the University of Bamberg. The purpose of the M.Sc. Digital Technologies in Heritage Conservation is to impart theoretical and practical knowledge and develop competence in critical assessment and object-oriented solutions. The aims, curriculum and methods of teaching will be discussed in this paper.

Keywords

Architecture Engineering Computer science Heritage conservation Digital technologies Curriculum Object-based learning (OBL) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The activity presented in the paper is part of the Digital Campus Bavaria and ‘Bayern Digital’ program by the Bavarian State Government, and Technology Alliance Upper Franconia. We would like to thank Prof. Dr. Holger Falter and Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stephan Breitling for the first concepts and grant application in the year 2015 that provided the opportunity to put this programme into practice under the co-authors joint development and under the lead of Prof. Dr. Mona Hess, University of Bamberg since October 2017. Photographs of students are reproduced with their kind permission.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hess
    • 1
    Email author
  • C. Schlieder
    • 2
  • A. Troi
    • 3
  • O. Huth
    • 3
  • M. Jagfeld
    • 3
  • J. Hindmarch
    • 1
  • A. Henrich
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Archaeology, Heritage Science and Art History, Humanities FacultyUniversity of BambergBambergGermany
  2. 2.Faculty of Information System and Applied Computer SciencesUniversity of BambergBambergGermany
  3. 3.Faculty of DesignCoburg University of Applied Sciences and ArtsCoburgGermany

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