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My Grandmother Falls Asleep Watching TV. Is She Depressed?

  • Candace Meinen
  • Bhanu Prakash KollaEmail author
  • Meghna P. Mansukhani
Chapter

Abstract

Advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD) is mainly seen in the elderly population with an estimated prevalence of 1–7%. Aging appears to impact the sleep-wake cycle. The elderly also appears to have reduced light exposure. This condition usually presents with excessive sleepiness in the evenings and insomnia in the early morning hours. Depression as a cause for early morning awakening should be ruled out. Treatment can include prescribed sleep-wake schedules, exercise, melatonin taken in the morning, and bright light exposure in the evening.

Keywords

Advance sleep-wake phase disorder Insomnia Hypersomnia Hypersomnolence Depression Excessive daytime sleepiness 

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Suggested Reading

  1. Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med. 2015;11(10):1199–236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Candace Meinen
    • 1
  • Bhanu Prakash Kolla
    • 2
    Email author
  • Meghna P. Mansukhani
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and PsychologyMayoClinicRochesterUSA

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