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Health System Decentralization and Recentralization in Denmark

  • Andrea TerlizziEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Public Policy book series (ISPP)

Abstract

The chapter provides empirical evidence on the Danish case. It describes the establishment of the highly decentralized Danish National Health Service (NHS) that took place between the 1960s and 1970s, presenting the main ideas and arguments which supported the creation of such an institutional arrangement. The chapter then describes the changes that occurred during the 1990s and 2000s and provides an explanation of why and how recentralization within the politico-legislative and fiscal dimensions of decentralization took place, showing how some arguments in favor of decentralization were debated and challenged. Finally, the chapter discusses the operation of the mechanism of ideational and institutional bricolage which has brought about the endogenous and evolutionary changes of the NHS.

Keywords

Denmark Fiscal federalism New public management Ideational and institutional bricolage Evolutionary change 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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