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Shopping While Veiled: An Exploration of the Experiences of Veiled Muslim Consumers in France

  • Ranam Alkayyali
Chapter

Abstract

Decades of controversies surrounding “Islamic veiling” in France have contributed to construct the practice as a racialized marker of Islam’s inferiority (Al-Saji in J Philos Soc Criticism 36(8):875–902, 2010; Fanon in A dying colonialism. New York, NY: Grove Press, 1965). This chapter questions how such a context impacts the everyday shopping experiences of Muslim women who wear headscarves. An analysis of 20 interviews confirms and extends existing literature on consumer racial profiling. I show how veiled consumers experience objectification, invisibilization, and intersectional oppression in French retail settings and how they cope with it (e.g., unveiling, “re-styling,” online shopping, “communitarianism,” and co-shopping). In conclusion, I discuss the implications of my results for the study of consumer racial profiling.

Keywords

Consumer racial profiling Discrimination Islam Shopping while Black Veil Hijab Burqa France Coping strategies Racialization Objectification Invisibilization Intersectionality Frantz Fanon Kimberlé Crenshaw Laurence Rossignol 

Further Reading

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  3. Pittman, C. (2017). “Shopping while Black”: Black consumers’ management of racial stigma and racial profiling in retail settings. Journal of Consumer Culture, 17(2). https://doi.org/10.1177/1469540517717777.
  4. Sandicki, Ö., & Ger, G. (2010). Veiling in style: How does a stigmatized practice become fashionable? Journal of Consumer Research, 37(1), 15–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ranam Alkayyali
    • 1
  1. 1.ISEG Digital Marketing and Communication School in ToulouseToulouseFrance

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