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The Unified Theory of Capitalism: An Overview

  • Adolfo FigueroaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The unified theory of capitalism has recently been presented as a new scientific endeavor in economics in several books. The first version was followed by a book containing the central theoretical and empirical findings, which then was followed by a third book dealing with the public policy implications of the unified theory. This is a fourth book in the series, dealing with further questions and implications of the unified theory. This chapter presents the unified theory of capitalism in its most elementary form. The idea is to make the book self-contained and thus help the reader to follow the essays of the book by understanding the foundations of unified theory; therefore, this chapter includes the primary assumptions of unified theory and its relevant models. The predictions of these models are then shown to be consistent with the basic facts of capitalism.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Economics DepartmentPontifical Catholic University of PeruLima, LimaPeru

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