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Digital Political Economy of India II

  • Shekh MoinuddinEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Geography book series (SPRINGERGEOGR)

Abstract

In India, the urban population is currently at 31% of the total population in the country and contributes over 60% of India’s GDP. It is projected that urban India will contribute nearly 75% of the national GDP in the next 15 years (https://www.nbmcw.com/tech-articles/tall-construction/34169-smart-cities-a-critical-appraisal.html, last accessed May 24, 2018.). Urban centres become the engine of development and at the same time negotiating with slum, sanitation, electricity, pollution, health, drinking water, and security and surveillance as well. Urban centres are becoming the hub of security and surveillance. Moreover, the smart cities are considered as an intricacy of competitiveness, capital, and sustainability. These intricacies cannot grow unless security and surveillance mechanisms are not functional across urban centres. These urban centres have the potential to develop into smart cities in India and shape the business of the security and surveillance in multiple folds.

Keywords

Security Surveillance Smart cities Mapping Political economy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Culture, Media and GovernanceJamia Millia IslamiaNew DelhiIndia

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