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Musicality: A Game to Improve Musical Perception

  • Nouri KhalassEmail author
  • Georgia Zarnomitrou
  • Kazi Injamamul Haque
  • Salim Salmi
  • Simon Maulini
  • Tanja Linkermann
  • Nestor Z. Salamon
  • J. Timothy Balint
  • Rafael Bidarra
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11385)

Abstract

Musicality is the concept that refers to a person’s ability to perceive and reproduce music. Due to its complexity, it can be best defined by different aspects of music like pitch, harmony, etc. Scientists believe that musicality is not an inherent trait possessed only by musicians but something anyone can nurture and train in themselves. In this paper we present a new game, named Musicality, that aims at measuring and improving the musicality of any person with some interest in music. Our application offers users a fun, quick, interactive way to accomplish this goal at their own pace. Specifically, our game focuses on three of the most basic aspects of musicality: instrument recognition, tempo and tone. For each aspect we created different mini-games in order to make training a varied and attractive activity.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank our commissioners Berend Glazenburg, Evert Rijntjes and Marc Stotijn for their invaluable guidance and contagious enthusiasm.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nouri Khalass
    • 1
    Email author
  • Georgia Zarnomitrou
    • 1
  • Kazi Injamamul Haque
    • 1
  • Salim Salmi
    • 1
  • Simon Maulini
    • 1
  • Tanja Linkermann
    • 1
  • Nestor Z. Salamon
    • 1
  • J. Timothy Balint
    • 1
  • Rafael Bidarra
    • 1
  1. 1.Delft University of TechnologyDelftNetherlands

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