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Making HSI More Intelligent: Human Systems Exploration Versus Experiment for the Integration of Humans and Artificial Cognitive Systems

  • Frank FlemischEmail author
  • Marcel C. A. Baltzer
  • Shadan Sadeghian
  • Ronald Meyer
  • Daniel López Hernández
  • Ralph Baier
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 903)

Abstract

When it comes to integrating humans, technical systems and organizations, the interplay of constructive and critical methods and tools is crucial for making the process and product of HSI really intelligent. This becomes even more important, when HSI is applied to the development of artificial cognitive systems, automation and autonomous systems e.g. in aircraft, ships, cars, intelligent factories or cyber defense systems. Experiments as a set of methods to test hypothesizes are well formulated and tested for decades. In contrast to experiments, concept and methods to systematically explore new human machine systems are relatively new and have to be systematized. Human Systems Exploration is a concept of connected activities and methods to systematically invent, conceptualize and test design and use spaces of human machine systems/socio-cyber-physical systems.

Keywords

HSI Automation Cognitive systems Autonomous systems Participatory design Human system exploration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Flemisch
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Marcel C. A. Baltzer
    • 1
  • Shadan Sadeghian
    • 1
  • Ronald Meyer
    • 2
  • Daniel López Hernández
    • 1
  • Ralph Baier
    • 2
  1. 1.Fraunhofer FKIEWachtberg/BonnGermany
  2. 2.Institut Für Arbeitswissenschaft (IAW), RWTH AachenAachenGermany

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