Advertisement

23 Anthropological Demography

  • David I. KertzerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Aware of significant theoretical and methodological limitations of mainstream demographic research, demographers have seen in sociocultural anthropology a potential source of enriching their work. As this chapter shows, anthropologists have long been interested in core demographic topics, yet many work on these topics with little reference to the demographic literature. After discussing the theoretical and methodological reasons why demographers have looked to anthropology, including both the concept of culture and the value of participant observation fieldwork, this chapter surveys the major work by anthropologists on demographic issues. Special attention is given to recent anthropological work on reproduction, marriage, mortality and migration.

Keywords

Anthropology Demography Culture Theory Methodology Fertility Mortality Marriage Household Reproduction Migration 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Many thanks to Caroline Bledsoe and Susan Greenhalgh for their suggestions, and to Jessaca Leinaweaver and Daniel J. Smith for their comments on a draft of this chapter.

References

  1. Ahearn, L. M. (2001). Invitations to love: Literacy, love letters, and social change in Nepal. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  2. Asghar, M., Murry, B., and Saraswathy, K. N. (2014). Fertility behavior and effect of son preference among the Muslims of Manipur, India. Journal of Anthropology, 2014. Google Scholar
  3. Baba, M. L. (2013). Anthropology and transnational migration: A focus on policy. International Migration, 51(2), 1–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bachrach, C. A. (2014). Culture and demography: From reluctant bedfellows to committed partners. Demography, 51(1), 3–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Ballinger, P. (2012). Borders and the rhythms of displacement, emplacement and mobility. In T.M. Wilson and D. Hastings (Eds.), A companion to border studies (387–404). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bava, S. (2011). Migration-religion studies in France: evolving toward a religious anthropology of movement. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 493–507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Becker, G. (1994). Metaphors in disrupted lives: Infertility and cultural constructions of continuity. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 8(4), 383–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bennett, J. W. (1976). The ecological transition. New York, NY: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  9. Besteman, C. (2016). Making refuge: Somali Bantu refugees and Lewiston, Maine. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bledsoe, C. (1990). The politics of children: fosterage and the social management of fertility among the Mende of Sierra Leone. In P. Handwerker (Ed.), Births and power: The politics of reproduction (81–100). Boulder, CO: Westview.Google Scholar
  11. Bledsoe, C. H. (2002). Contingent lives: Fertility, time, and aging in West Africa. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Bledsoe, C., Banja, F., and Hill, A. G. (1998). Reproductive mishaps and western contraception: an African challenge to fertility theory. Population and Development Review, 24(1), 15–57.Google Scholar
  13. Bledsoe, C., Lerner, S., and Guyer, J. (Eds.). (2000). Fertility and the male life cycle in the era of fertility decline. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  14. Bledsoe, C., Houle, R., and Sow, P. (2007). High fertility Gambians in low fertility Spain: The dynamics of child accumulation across transnational space. Demographic Research, 16, 375–412.Google Scholar
  15. Bledsoe, C. and Pison, G. (1994). Introduction. In C. Bledsoe and G. Pison (Eds.), Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives (1–22). Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  16. Bledsoe, C. and Sow, P. (2013). Back to Africa: Second chances for the children of West African immigrants. In L. Oso and N. Ribas-Mateos (Eds.), The international handbook on gender, migration and transnationalism: Global and development perspectives (185–207). Cheltenham, UK: Elgar Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Bledsoe, C. and Sow, P. (2011). Family reunification ideals and the practice of transnational reproductive life among Africans in Europe. In C. Browner and C. Sargent (Eds.) Reproduction, globalization, and the state (175–91). Durham, NC: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Block, E. (2014). Flexible kinship: caring for AIDS orphans in rural Lesotho. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 20(4), 711–727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Boling, P. (2008). Demography, culture, and policy: Understanding Japan’s low fertility. Population and Development Review, 34(2), 307–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Borgerhoff- Mulder, M. (1989). Marital status and reproductive performance in Kipsigis women: re-evaluating the polygyny-fertility hypothesis. Population Studies, 43(2), 285–304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Bradley, C. (1995). Women’s empowerment and fertility decline in Western Kenya. In S. Greenhalgh (Ed.) Situating fertility (157–78). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Brettell, C. (2014). Theorizing migration in anthropology. In C. Brettell and J. Hollifield (Eds.) Migration theory, 3rd ed., (148–97). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Brettell, C. 2017. “Marriage and migration.” Annual Review of Anthropology 46:81–97.Google Scholar
  24. Brown, M.J. (2015). Collective identities, shifting population membership, and niche construction theory: Implications from Taiwanese and Chinese empirical evidence. In P. Kreager, B. Winney, S. Ulijaszek, and C. Capelli, (Eds.) Population in the human sciences (331–60). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Browner, C. H. (2000). Situating women’s reproductive activities. American Anthropologist, 102(4), 773–788.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Browner, C. and Sargent, C. (Eds.). (2011). Reproduction, globalization, and the state. Durham, NC: Duke University PressGoogle Scholar
  27. Brunson, J. (2010). Son preference in the context of fertility decline: limits to new constructions of gender and kinship in Nepal. Studies in Family Planning, 41(2), 89–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Brunson, J. (2016). Planning families in Nepal. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Cabot, H. (2013). The social aesthetics of eligibility: NGO aid and indeterminacy in the Greek asylum process. American Ethnologist, 40(3), 452–466.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Caldwell, J. C. (1982). Theory of fertility decline. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  31. Caldwell, J. C. and Hill, A. (1988). Recent developments using micro-approaches to demographic research. In J. C. Caldwell, A. Hill, and V. Hull (Eds.) Micro-approaches to demographic research (1–9). London, UK: Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  32. Carter, A. T. (1998). Cultural models and demographic behavior. In A. Basu and P. Aaby (Eds.) The methods and uses of anthropological demography (246–67). Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  33. Cecil, R. (Ed). (1996). The anthropology of pregnancy loss. Oxford, UK: Berg.Google Scholar
  34. Chamberlain, A. (2009). Archaeological demography. Human Biology, 81(3), 275–286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Chatty, D. (2014). Anthropology and forced migration. In E. Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, G. Loescher, K. Long, and N. Sigona (Eds.) Oxford handbook of refugee and forced migration studies (74–85). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Chavez, L. R. (1991). Outside the imagined community: Undocumented settlers and experiences of incorporation. American Ethnologist, 18(2), 257–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Chung, W., and Das Gupta, M. (2007). The decline of son preference in South Korea: The roles of development and public policy. Population and Development Review, 33(4), 757–783.Google Scholar
  38. Cleland, J., and Wilson, C. (1987). Demand theories of the fertility transition: An iconoclastic view. Population Studies, 41(1), 5–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Cliggett, L. (2000). Social components of migration: experiences from Southern Province, Zambia. Human Organization, 59(1), 125–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Coast, E. (2003). An evaluation of demographers’ use of ethnographies. Population Studies, 57(3), 337–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Coast, E. E., Hampshire, K. R., and Randall, S. C. (2007). Disciplining anthropological demography. Demographic Research, 16, 493.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Coe, C. (2011). What is the impact of transnational migration on family life? Women’s comparisons of internal and international migration in a small town in Ghana. American Ethnologist, 38(1), 148–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Coe, C. (2016). Orchestrating care in time: Ghanaian migrant women, family, and reciprocity. American Anthropologist, 118(1), 37–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Cohen, J. H. (2011). Migration, remittances, and household strategies. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 103–114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Cole, J. (1997). The new racism in Europe: A Sicilian ethnography. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Cole, J. and Thomas, L.M. (Eds.). (2009). Love in Africa. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  47. Collard, C., and Kashmeri, S. (2011). Embryo adoption: Emergent forms of siblingship among Snowflakes® families. American Ethnologist, 38(2), 307–322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Das Gupta, M. (1987). Selective discrimination against female children in rural Punjab, India. Population and Development Review, 13(1), 77–100.Google Scholar
  49. Das Gupta, M. (1995). Life course perspectives on women’s autonomy and health outcomes. American Anthropologist, 97(3), 481–491.Google Scholar
  50. Das Gupta, M. (1997). Kinship systems and demographic regimes. In D.I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological demography (36–52). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  51. Das Gupta, M. (2010). Family systems, political systems and Asia’s ‘missing girls’: The construction of son preference and its unravelling. Asian Population Studies, 6(2), 123–152.Google Scholar
  52. Das Gupta, M., Chung, W., and Shuzhuo, L. (2009). Evidence for an incipient decline in numbers of missing girls in China and India. Population and Development Review, 35(2), 401–416.Google Scholar
  53. Davis-Lloyd, R. and Sargent, C.F. (Eds.). (1997). Childbirth and authoritative knowledge: Cross-cultural perspectives. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  54. Delaney, C. (1991). The Seed and the soil. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  55. Deomampo, D. (2016). Transnational reproduction: Race, kinship, and commercial surrogacy in India. New York, NY: New York University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. DiCarlo, L. (2008). Migrating to America. New York: Tauris.Google Scholar
  57. Dick, H. P. (2011). Language and migration to the United States. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 227–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Fassin, D. (2011). Policing borders, producing boundaries. The governmentality of immigration in dark times. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 213–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Ferguson, J. (1999). Expectations of modernity: Myths and meanings of urban life on the Zambian Copperbelt. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  60. Firth, R. (1968; orig. 1936). We, the Tikopia. Boston, MA: Beacon.Google Scholar
  61. Foner, N. (2000). From Ellis Island to New York. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  62. Foner, N. (Ed.) (2001). New immigrants in New York, revised ed. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  63. Foner, N. (2005). In a new land: A comparative view of immigration. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  64. Foner, N. (2013). “Immigrants in New York City in the new millenium.” In N. Foner (Ed.) Out of three: Immigrant New York in the twenty-first century (1–34). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  65. Fortes, M. (1943). A note on fertility among the Tallensi of the Gold Coast. The Sociological Review, 35(3–4), 99–112.Google Scholar
  66. French, J. C. (2016). Demography and the Palaeolithic archaeological record. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory, 23(1), 150–199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Fricke, T. (1994). Himalayan households: Tamang demography and domestic processes. Enlarged Edition. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  68. Ginsburg, F. and R. Rapp. (1995). Introduction. In F. Ginsburg and R. Rapp (Eds.) Conceiving the new world order: The global politics of reproduction (1–17). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  69. Glick-Schiller, N., Basch, L., and Blanc-Szanton, C. (1992). Transnationalism: A new analytic framework for understanding migration. In N. Glick-Schiller, L. Basch and C. Blanc-Szanton (Eds.) Towards a transnational perspective on migration (1–24). New York, NY: Annals of the New York Academy of Science.Google Scholar
  70. Gmelch, G. (1992). Double passage: The lives of Caribbean migrants abroad and back home. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  71. Gmelch, G., and Gmelch, S. B. (1995). Gender and migration: The readjustment of women migrants in Barbados, Ireland, and Newfoundland. Human Organization, 54(4), 470–473.Google Scholar
  72. Goody, J. (1983). The development of the family and marriage in Europe. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Greenhalgh, S. (1990). Toward a political economy of fertility: Anthropological contributions. Population and Development Review, 16(1), 85–106.Google Scholar
  74. Greenhalgh, S. (1994). Controlling births and bodies in village China. American Ethnologist, 21(1), 3–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Greenhalgh, S. (1995). Anthropology theorizes reproduction: Integrating practice, political economic, and feminist perspectives. In S. Greenhalgh (Ed.) Situating fertility (3–28). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  76. Greenhalgh, S. (1997). Methods and meanings: Reflections on disciplinary difference. Population and Development Review, 23(4), 819–824.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Greenhalgh, S. (2003). Planned births, unplanned persons: "Population" in the making of Chinese modernity. American Ethnologist, 30(2), 196–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Greenhalgh, S. (2008). Just one child: Science and policy in Deng’s China. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Greenhalgh, S. (2012). On the crafting of population knowledge. Population and Development Review, 38(1), 121–131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Greenhalgh, S. (2013). Patriarchal demographics? China’s sex ratio reconsidered. Population and Development Review, 38(s1), 130–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Gribaldo, A., Judd, M. D., and Kertzer, D. I. (2009). An imperfect contraceptive society: Fertility and contraception in Italy. Population and Development Review, 35(3), 551–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Gutmann, M. (2007). Fixing men: Sex, birth control, and AIDS in Mexico. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  83. Guyer, J. I. (1994). Lineal identities and lateral networks: The logic of polyandrous motherhood. In C. Bledsoe and G. Pison (Eds.) Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa: contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives (231–52). Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  84. Guyer, J. I. (2000). Traditions of studying paternity in social anthropology. In C. Bledsoe, S. Lerner, and J. Guyer (Eds.) Fertility and the male life cycle in the era of fertility decline (61–90). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  85. Hammel, E. A. (1972). The zadruga as process. In P. Laslett and R. Wall (Eds.) Household and family in past time (335–73). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. Hammel, E. A. (1990). A theory of culture for demography. Population and Development Review, 16(1), 455–485.Google Scholar
  87. Hammel, E. A. (1995). Economics 1, culture 0: Fertility change and differences in the Northwest Balkans, 1700–1900. In S. Greenhalgh (Ed.) Situating fertility (225–58). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  88. Han, S., Betsinger, T.K., and Scott, A.B. (Eds). (2017). The anthropology of the fetus. New York, NY: Berghahn.Google Scholar
  89. Handwerker, W. P. (1990). Politics and reproduction: A window on social change. In W. P. Handwerker (Ed.) Births and power: Social change and the politics of reproduction (1–38). Boulder, CO: Westview.Google Scholar
  90. Harris, M. (1966). The cultural ecology of India’s sacred cattle. Current Anthropology, 7(1), 51–66.Google Scholar
  91. Harris, M. and Ross, E.B. (1987). Death, sex and fertility. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  92. Herdt, G. (Ed). (1997). Sexual cultures and migration in the era of AIDS. New York, NY: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  93. Hill, A. G. (1997). Truth lies in the eye of the beholder: The nature of evidence in demography and anthropology. In D. I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological demography (223–47). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  94. Hirsch, J. S. (1999). En el norte la mujer manda: Gender, generation, and geography in a Mexican transnational community. American Behavioral Scientist, 42(9), 1332–1349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Hirsch, J. S. (2014). Labor migration, externalities and ethics: Theorizing the meso-level determinants of HIV vulnerability. Social Science and Medicine, 100, 38–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Hirsch, J. S. (2015). Desire across borders: markets, migration, and marital HIV risk in rural Mexico. Culture, Health and Sexuality, 17(sup1), 20–33.Google Scholar
  97. Hirsch, J.S. and Wardlow, H. (Eds.). (2006). Modern loves: The anthropology of romantic courtship and companionate marriage. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  98. Hirsch, J.S., Wardlow, H., Smith, D.H., Phinney, H.M., Parikh, S., and Nathanson, C.A. (2010). The secret: Love, marriage, and HIV. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.Google Scholar
  99. Hollos, M. (1992). Why is it difficult to take a census in Nigeria? The problem of indigenous conceptions of households. Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, 25(1), 12–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Hollos, M., Larsen, U., Obono, O., and Whitehouse, B. (2009). The problem of infertility in high fertility populations: meanings, consequences and coping mechanisms in two Nigerian communities. Social Science and Medicine, 68(11), 2061–2068.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Holmes, S. M., and Castañeda, H. (2016). Representing the “European refugee crisis” in Germany and beyond: Deservingness and difference, life and death. American Ethnologist, 43(1), 12–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. Inhorn, M.C. (1994). The quest for conception: Gender, infertility, and Egyptian medical tradition. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  103. Inhorn, M.C. (1996). Infertility and patriarchy: The cultural politics of gender and family life in Egypt. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
  104. Inhorn, M. C., and Birenbaum-Carmeli, D. (2008). Assisted reproductive technologies and culture change. Annual Review of Anthropology, 37, 177–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Ivry, T. (2010). Kosher medicine and medicalized halacha: An exploration of triadic relations among Israeli rabbis, doctors, and infertility patients. American Ethnologist, 37(4), 662–680.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Johnson-Hanks, J. (2006). Uncertain honor: Modern motherhood in an African crisis. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  107. Johnson-Hanks, J. (2007). What kind of theory for anthropological demography? Demographic Research, 16, 1–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Johnson-Hanks, J. (2008). Demographic transitions and modernity. Annual Review of Anthropology, 37, 301–315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Johnson-Hanks, J., Bachrach, C.A., Morgan, S.P. and Kohler, H.P. (2011). Understanding family change and variation. New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Kallius, A., Monterescu, D., and Rajaram, P. K. (2016). Immobilizing mobility: Border ethnography, illiberal democracy, and the politics of the “refugee crisis” in Hungary. American Ethnologist, 43(1), 25–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  111. Kandel, W., and Massey, D. S. (2002). The culture of Mexican migration: A theoretical and empirical analysis. Social Forces, 80(3), 981–1004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Kearney, M. (1995). The local and the global: The anthropology of globalization and transnationalism. Annual Review of Anthropology, 24(1), 547–565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Kertzer, D. I. (1989). The joint family household revisited: Demographic constraints and household complexity in the European past. Journal of Family History, 14(1), 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Kertzer, D.I. (1993). Sacrificed for honor: Italian infant abandonment and the politics of reproductive control. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  115. Kertzer, D.I. (1995). Political-economic and cultural explanations of demographic behavior. In S. Greenhalgh (Ed.) Situating fertility (29–52). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  116. Kertzer, D.I. (1997). The proper role of culture in demographic explanation. In G.W. Jones et al. (Eds.) The Continuing Demographic Transition (137–57). Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  117. Kertzer, D. I. (2017). The perils of reification: Identity categories and identity construction in migration research. In F. Decimo and A. Gribaldo (Eds.) Boundaries within: Nation, kinship and identity among migrants and minorities (23–34). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  118. Kertzer D.I. and Arel, D. (2002). Censuses, identity formation, and the struggle for political power. In D.I. Kertzer and D. Arel (Eds.) Census and identity (1–42). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  119. Kertzer, D. I. and Arel, D. (2006). Population composition as an object of political struggle. In R. Goodin and C. Tilly (Eds.) The Oxford handbook of contextual political analysis (664–677). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  120. Kertzer, D. I. and Fricke, T. (1997). Toward an anthropological demography. In D.I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological demography (1–35). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  121. Kertzer, D. I. and Hogan, D.P. (1989). Family, political economy, and demographic change. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  122. Kertzer, D. I., White, M. J., Bernardi, L., and Gabrielli, G. (2009). Italy’s path to very low fertility: The adequacy of economic and second demographic transition theories. European Journal of Population, 25(1), 89–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. Kligman, G. (1998). The politics of duplicity: Controlling reproduction in Ceausescu’s Romania. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  124. Knodel, J. and van de Walle, E. (1986). Lessons from the past: Policy implications of historical fertility studies. In A. Coale and S. Watkins (Eds.) The decline of fertility in Europe (420–29). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  125. Kreager, P. (1985). Demographic regimes as cultural systems. In D. Coleman and R. Schofield (Eds.) The state of population theory (131–55). Oxford, UK: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  126. Lee, R. B. and DeVore, I. (Eds.). (1968). Man the hunter. Chicago, IL: Aldine.Google Scholar
  127. Leinaweaver, J. B. (2007). On moving children: the social implications of Andean child circulation. American Ethnologist, 34(1), 163–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  128. Leinaweaver, J. B. (2010). Outsourcing care: how Peruvian migrants meet transnational family obligations. Latin American Perspectives, 37(5), 67–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Leinaweaver, J. B. 2013. Adoptive migration: Raising Latinos in Spain. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  130. Leinaweaver, J. B. (2014). The quiet migration redux: International adoption, race, and difference. Human Organization, 73(1), 62–71.Google Scholar
  131. Leinaweaver, J. B. (2015). Adoption, demography of. In J. D. Wright (Ed.) International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences vol. 1, 2nd edition (136–41). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  132. Levine, N. E. (1980). Nyinba polyandry and the allocation of paternity. Journal of Comparative Family Studies 11(3), 283–298.Google Scholar
  133. Levine, N. E., and Silk, J. B. (1997). Why polyandry fails: Sources of instability in polyandrous marriages. Current Anthropology, 38(3), 375–398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  134. Lorimer, F. et al. (1954). Culture and human fertility. Paris, France: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  135. Lubkemann, S. C. (2000). The transformation of transnationality among Mozambican migrants in South Africa. Canadian Journal of African Studies, 34(1), 41–63.Google Scholar
  136. Lubkemann, S. C. (2008). Culture in chaos: An anthropology of the social conditions in war. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  137. MacCormack, C.P., ed. (1994). Ethnography of fertility and birth, 2nd ed. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland.Google Scholar
  138. Mahler, S. J., and Pessar, P. R. (2006). Gender matters: Ethnographers bring gender from the periphery toward the core of migration studies. International Migration Review, 40(1), 27–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  139. Malkki, L. H. (1995). Refugees and exile: From “refugee studies” to the national order of things. Annual Review of Anthropology, 24, 495–523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  140. Malkki, L.H. (2012). Purity and exile: Violence, memory, and national cosmology among Hutu refugees in Tanzania. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  141. Margolis, M.L. (1994). Little Brazil: An ethnography of Brazilian immigrants in New York City. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  142. Martin, E. (1987). The woman in the body: A cultural analysis of reproduction. Boston, MA: Beacon.Google Scholar
  143. Martin, E. (1991). The egg and the sperm: How science has constructed a romance based on stereotypical male-female roles. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 16(3), 485–501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  144. Marx, E. (1990). The social world of refugees: A conceptual framework. Journal of Refugee Studies, 3(3), 189–203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Massey, D.S. (2000). When surveys fail: An alternative for data collection. In A. A. Stone et al. (Eds.) The science of self-report (145–60). Mahwah, N.J.: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  146. Massey, D.S., Alarcón, R., Durand, J., and González, H. (1990). Return to Aztlan: The social process of international migration from Western Mexico. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  147. Massey, D. S., and Zenteno, R. (2000). A validation of the ethnosurvey: The case of Mexico-US migration. International Migration Review, 34(3), 766–793.Google Scholar
  148. McNicoll, G. (1980). Institutional determinants of fertility change. Population and Development Review, 6(3), 441–462.Google Scholar
  149. Miner, G.R., Wood, J.W. and Boldsen, J.L. (2008). Advances in paleodemography. In M.A. Katzenber and S.R. Saunders (Eds.) Biological anthropology of the human skeleton (561–600). New York, NY: Wiley-Liss.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  150. Nations, M. K., and Rebhun, L. A. (1988). Angels with wet wings won’t fly: Maternal sentiment in Brazil and the image of neglect. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 12(2), 141–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  151. Notes and Queries on Anthropology, drawn up by a Committee Appointed by the British Association for the Advancement of Science. (1874). London: Stanford.Google Scholar
  152. Oppenheimer, V. K. (2003). Cohabiting and marriage during young men’s career-development process. Demography, 40(1), 127–149.Google Scholar
  153. Parikh, S. (2016). Regulating romance: Youth love letters, moral anxiety, and intervention in Uganda’s time of AIDS. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press.Google Scholar
  154. Petit, V. (2013). Counting populations, understanding societies: Towards an interpretive demography. New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  155. Radcliffe-Brown, A.R. (1964; orig. 1922). The Andaman Islanders. Glencoe: Free Press.Google Scholar
  156. Randall, S., Coast, E., and Leone, T. (2011). Cultural constructions of the concept of household in sample surveys. Population Studies, 65(2), 217–229.Google Scholar
  157. Rebhun, L.A. (2002). The heart is unknown country: Love in the changing economy of Northeast Brazil. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  158. Redfield, R. (1941). The folk culture of Yucatan. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  159. Reeves, M. (2013). Clean fake: Authenticating documents and persons in migrant Moscow. American Ethnologist, 40(3), 508–524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  160. Renne, E. P. (1995). Houses, fertility, and the Nigerian land use act. Population and Development Review, 21(1), 113–126.Google Scholar
  161. Renne, E.P. and van de Walle, E. (Eds.). (2001). Regulating mensturation. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  162. Rivkin-Fish, M. (2010). Pronatalism, gender politics, and the renewal of family support in Russia: Toward a feminist anthropology of “maternity capital”. Slavic Review, 69(3), 701–724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  163. Root, L., and Johnson‐Hanks, J. (2016). Gender, honor, and aggregate fertility. American Journal of Economics and Sociology, 75(4), 904–928.Google Scholar
  164. Sargent, C., and Larchanché, S. (2011). Transnational migration and global health: the production and management of risk, illness, and access to care. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 345–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  165. Scheper-Hughes, N. (1992). Death without weeping: The violence of everyday life in Brazil. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  166. Scheper-Hughes, N. (1997). Demography without numbers. In D.I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological demography (201–222). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  167. Schiller, N. G., Basch, L., and Blanc, C. S. (1995). From immigrant to transmigrant: Theorizing transnational migration. Anthropological Quarterly, 68(1), 48–63.Google Scholar
  168. Schneider, J. and Schneider, P. (1996). Festival of the poor: Fertility decline and the ideology of class in Sicily, 1860–1980. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
  169. Scrimshaw, S. (1983). Infanticide as deliberate fertility regulation. In R. Bulatao and R. Lee (Eds.) Determinants of fertility in developing countries, II (245–66). New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  170. Setel, P. 2000. Someone to take my place: fertility and the male life-course among Coastal Boiken, East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. In C. Bledsoe, S. Lerner, and J.Guyer (Eds.) Fertility and the male life cycle in the era of fertility decline (61–90). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  171. Silverstein, P. A. (2005). Immigrant racialization and the new savage slot: Race, migration, and immigration in the new Europe. Annual Review of Anthropology, 34, 363–384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  172. Skinner, G. W. (1993). Conjugal power in Tokugawa Japanese families: A matter of life or death. In B. Miller (Ed.) Sex and gender hierarchies (236–70). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  173. Skinner, G. W. (1997). Family systems and demographic processes. In D. I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological Demography (53–95). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  174. Sigle-Rushton, W., and McLanahan, S. (2002). The living arrangements of new unmarried mothers. Demography, 39(3), 415–433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  175. Smith, D. J. (2011). Rural-to-urban migration, kinship networks, and fertility among the Igbo in Nigeria. African Population Studies, 25(2), 320–336.Google Scholar
  176. Smith, D.J. (2014). AIDS doesn’t show its face: Inequality, morality and social change in Nigeria. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  177. Smith, D.J. (2017). To be a man is not a one-day job: Masculinity, money, and intimacy in Nigeria. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  178. Smith, D. J., and Mbakwem, B. C. (2010). Antiretroviral therapy and reproductive life projects: Mitigating the stigma of AIDS in Nigeria. Social Science and Medicine, 71(2), 345–352.Google Scholar
  179. Smith, T.C. (1977). Nakahara: Family farming and population in a Japanese village, 1717–1830. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  180. Steward, J. H. (1936). The economic and social basis of primitive bands. In R.L. Lowie (Ed.) Essays in honor of A.L. Kroeber (331–45). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  181. Townsend, N. (1997). Reproduction in anthropology and demography. In D.I. Kertzer and T. Fricke (Eds.) Anthropological demography (96–114). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  182. Townsend, N. (2000). Male fertility as a lifetime of relationships: Contextualizing men’s biological reproduction in Botswana. In C. Bledsoe, S. Lerner, and J.Guyer (Eds.) Fertility and the male life cycle in the era of fertility decline (343–64). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  183. Van der Geest, S. (1998). Participant observation in demographic research: Fieldwork experiences in a Ghanaian community. In A. Basu and P. Aaby (Eds.) The methods and uses of anthropological demography (39–56). Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  184. Vertovec, S. (2007). Introduction: New directions in the anthropology of migration and multiculturalism. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 30(6), 961–978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  185. Vertovec, S. (2011). The cultural politics of nation and migration. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 241–256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  186. Vogt, W. A. (2013). Crossing Mexico: Structural violence and the commodification of undocumented Central American migrants. American Ethnologist, 40(4), 764–780.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  187. Wentzell, E.A. (2013). Maturing masculinities: Aging, chronic illness, and viagra in Mexico. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  188. White, J. B. (1997). Turks in the new Germany. American Anthropologist, 99(4), 754–769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  189. Whitehouse, B. (2009). Transnational childrearing and the preservation of transnational identity in Brazzaville, Congo. Global Networks, 9(1), 82–99.Google Scholar
  190. Whitehouse, B. (2012). Migrants and strangers in an African city. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  191. Wilson, T. M. and Donnan, H. (2012). Borders and border studies. In T.M. Wilson and H. Donnan (Eds.) A companion to border studies (1–27). New York, NY: Wiley-Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  192. Wood, J. W. (1994). Dynamics of human reproduction: Biology, biometry, demography. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  193. Yarris, K.E. (2017). Care across generations: Solidarity and sacrifice in transnational families. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

Personalised recommendations