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16 International Migration

  • Susan K. BrownEmail author
  • Frank D. Bean
  • Sabrina Nasir
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

This chapter examines the size and scope of international migration, its theoretical underpinnings, and measures of migration. More than 3% of the world’s population consists of international migrants, who are not evenly distributed but concentrated in high-income destination countries. The countries of origin are becoming more diverse, with India now providing more migrants than any other. Immigration policies in destination countries increasingly favor highly educated immigrants. The chapter focuses also on the United States, the largest receiving country for immigrants. There, the ongoing retirement of the Baby Boom, decades of below-replacement fertility among the native-born population, and growth in college attendance have given rise to a need for more less-skilled workers, many of whom are immigrants.

Keywords

International migration Immigration Net migration Refugees Immigration theory Stocks and flows Unauthorized migration Legal permanent residency 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan K. Brown
    • 1
    Email author
  • Frank D. Bean
    • 1
  • Sabrina Nasir
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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