Advertisement

Prologue

  • Dudley L. PostonJr.Email author
  • Michael Micklin
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

The field of demography has evolved significantly since the 1950s. The first compendium of the discipline of demography was the landmark volume, The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal, by Philip M. Hauser and Otis Dudley Duncan, first published in 1959. The Study of Population is a useful benchmark for gauging the nature and extent of change in the field of demography in the six decades since its publication. The chapters contained in that volume were grouped into four sections. Part I, Demography as a Science, contained four chapters laying out the substantive, methodological, epistemological, and organizational foundations of the discipline (Hauser and Duncan 1959a, b, c, d). Part II, Development and Current Status of Demography, offered eight chapters portraying the origins and practice of demography in selected nations, along with an insightful overview of disciplinary history (Lorimer 1959). Part III, Elements of Demography, included a dozen chapters covering the demographic equation, the structure and components of change, as well as assessments of demographic data. Finally, Part IV, Population Studies in Various Disciplines, contained seven chapters discussing common interests of demography and selected disciplines, including sociology (Moore 1959), economics (Spengler 1959), and human ecology (Duncan 1959).

References

  1. Ahlburg, D.A. and Lutz, W. (1998). Introduction: The Need to Rethink Approaches to Population Forecasts. Population and Development Review, 24 (Supplement), 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ahlburg, D.A., Lutz, W., and Vaupel, J.W. (1998). Ways to Improve Population Forecasting: What Should Be Done Differently in the Future? Population and Development Review, 24, (Supplement), 191–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barclay, G.W. (1958). Techniques of Population Analysis. New York, NY: John Wiley.Google Scholar
  4. Bongaarts, J. (2009). Human Population Growth and the Demographic Transition. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Science, 364 (1532), 2985–2990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brass, W. (1996). Demographic Data Analysis in Less Developed Countries, 1946–1996. Population Studies, 50, (3), 451–467.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bryan, T. (2004). Basic Sources of Statistics. In J.S. Siegel and D.A. Swanson (Eds.), The Methods and Materials of Demography (2d ed.) (Pp. 9–41). San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic.Google Scholar
  7. Caldwell, J.C. (1997). The Global Fertility Transition: The Need for a Unifying Theory. Population and Development Review, 23 (4), 803–812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cleland, J. (1996). Demographic Data Collection in Less Developed Countries, 1946–1996. Population Studies, 50, (3), 433–450.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cleland, J. and Hobcroft, J. (1985). Reproductive Change in Developing Countries: Insights from the World Fertility Survey. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Cleland, J., Scott, C., and Whitelegge, D. (1987). The World Fertility Survey: An Assessment. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Coale, A.J. and Demeny, P. (1968). Methods of Evaluating Basic Demographic Measures from Limited and Defective Data. New York, NY: United Nations.Google Scholar
  12. Coleman, D.A. and Schofield, R. (1986). The State of Population Theory: Forward from Malthus. Oxford, England: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  13. Coleman, D.A. (2006). Immigration and Ethnic Change in Low-fertility Countries: A Third Demographic Transition. Population and Development Review, 32, 401–446.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Cox, P.R. (1976). Demography. Fifth Edition. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Crimmins, E.M. (1993). Demography: The Past 30 Years, the Present, and the Future. Demography, 30 (4), 579–591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Duncan, O.D. (1959). Human Ecology and Population Studies. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 678–716). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  17. Fossett, M. (2017). New Methods for Measuring and Analyzing Segregation. New York, NY: Springer Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Gryn, T.A. (1997). Internet Resources for Demographers. Population Index, 63 (2), 189–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Gutman, R. (1960). In Defense of Population Theory. American Sociological Review, 25 (3), 325–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Halli, S.S. and Rao, K.V. (1992). Advanced Techniques of Population Analysis. New York, NY: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hauser, P.M. and Duncan, O.D. (1959a). The Data and Methods. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 45–75). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  22. Hauser, P.M. and Duncan, O.D. (1959b). Demography as a Body of Knowledge. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 76–105). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  23. Hauser, P.M. and Duncan, O.D. (1959c). Demography as a Profession. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 106–117). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  24. Hauser, P.M. and Duncan, O.D. (1959d). The Nature of Demography. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 29–44). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  25. Hill, R., Stycos, J.M., and Back, K. (1959). The Family and Population Control: A Puerto Rican Experiment in Social Change. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar
  26. Hinde, A. (1998). Demographic Methods. New York, NY: Edward Arnold PublishersGoogle Scholar
  27. Hirschman, C. (1994). Why Fertility Changes. Annual Review of Sociology, 20, 203–233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. (IUSSP) International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. (2017). Annual Activities and Management Report. Paris, France: IUSSP/UIESP.Google Scholar
  29. Johnson, P.D. (2000). Population Censuses: Observations on the Past 50 Years and a Peek at the New Century. Paper presented at the Workshop on Gridding Population Data, Columbia University, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  30. Keyfitz, N. (1975). How Do We Know the Facts of Demography? Population and Development Review, 1 (2), 267–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Keyfitz, N. (1981). The Limits of Population Forecasting. Population and Development Review, 7 (4), 579–593.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Keyfitz, N. (1985). Applied Mathematical Demography. New York, NY: Wiley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Kirk, D. (1960). Some Reflections on American Demography in the Nineteen Sixties. Population Index 26 (4), 305–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Kirk, D. (1996). Demographic Transition Theory. Population Studies, 50 (3), 361–387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Kiser, C.V. (1953). The Indianapolis Fertility Study-An Example of Planned Observational Research. Public Opinion Quarterly, 17 (4), 496–510.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Kiser, C.V. and Whelpton, P.K. (1953). Resume of the Indianapolis Study of Social and Psychological Factors Affecting Fertility. Population Studies, 7 (2), 95–110.Google Scholar
  37. Lee, R. (2003). The Demographic Transition: Three Centuries of Fundamental Change. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 17 (4), 167–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Lesthaeghe, R.J. (1995). The Second Demographic Transition in Western Countries: An Interpretation. In K.O. Mason and A.M. Jensen (eds.), Gender and Family Change in Industrialized Countries (Pp. 17–62). Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  39. Lesthaeghe, R.J. (2010). The Unfolding Story of the Second Demographic Transition. Population and Development Review, 36, 211–251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Lorimer, F. (1959). The Development of Demography. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 124–179). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  41. Mason, K.O. (1997). Explaining Fertility Transitions. Demography, 34 (4), 443–454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Mertens, W. (1994). The Context of IUSSP Contributions to the International Conference on Population and Development (Pp. 1–14). Liége, Belgium: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population.Google Scholar
  43. Moore, W.E. (1959). Sociology and Demography. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 832–851). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  44. Nam, C.B. (1979). The Progress of Demography as a Scientific Discipline. Demography, 16 (4), 485–492.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Namboodiri, K. (1991) Demographic Analysis: A Stochastic Approach. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  46. Pollard, A.H., Yusuf, F. and Pollard, G.N. (1981). Demographic Techniques. New York, NY: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  47. Poston, D.L., Jr. and Bouvier, L.F. (2017). Population and Society: An Introduction to Demography. 2nd edition. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  48. Poston, D.L., Jr. and Micklin, M. (2005). Handbook of Population. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.Google Scholar
  49. Preston, S., Heuveline, P., and Guillot, M. (2001). Demography: Measuring and Modeling Population Processes. Malden, MA: Blackwell PublishersGoogle Scholar
  50. Rowland, D.T. (2003). Demographic Methods and Concepts. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Schoen, R. (2018) Analytical Family Demography. New York, NY: Springer Publishers.Google Scholar
  52. Shryock, H.S. and Siegel, J.S., and Associates. (1971). The Methods and Materials of Demography. Two Volumes. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  53. Shryock, H.S. and Siegel, J.S., and Associates. (1976). The Methods and Materials of Demography. Condensed Edition by E.G. Stockwell. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  54. Siegel, J.S. (2002). Applied Demography: Applications to Business, Government, Law and Public Policy. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  55. Siegel, J.S. and Swanson, D. (2004). The Methods and Materials of Demography. Second Edition. Boston, MA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  56. Smith, D.P. (1992). Formal Demography. New York, NY: Plenum Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Smith, S., Tayman, J., and Swanson, D. (2013). A Practitioner's Guide to State and Local Population Projection. New York, NY: Springer Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Spengler, J.J. (1959). Economics and Demography. In P.M. Hauser and O.D. Duncan (Eds.), The Study of Population: An Inventory and Appraisal (Pp. 791–851). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  59. Spiegelman, M. (1968). Introduction to Demography. Revised Edition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  60. Stolnitz, G.J. (1983). Three to Five Main Challenges to Demographic Research. Demography, 20 (4), 415–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Stycos, J.M. (1955). Family and Fertility in Puerto Rico: A Study of the Lower Income Group. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  62. Szreter, S. (1993). The Idea of Demographic-Transition and the Study of Fertility Change - a Critical Intellectual History. Population and Development Review, 19 (4), 659–701.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Taeuber, I.B. (1959). Demographic Research in the Pacific Area. In P.M. Hauser and O.D Duncan (eds.), The Study of Population (Pp. 259–285). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  64. Thomas, R.T. (2018). Concepts, Methods and Practical Applications in Applied Demography. New York, NY: Springer Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. United Nations. (2017). World Population Prospects, The 2017 Revision: Highlights. New York, NY: United Nations.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. (UNICEF) United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund. (2002). Birth Registration Right from the Start. Florence: UNICEF.Google Scholar
  67. (UNICEF) United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. (2013). Levels and Trends in Child Mortality. New York, NY: UNICEF.Google Scholar
  68. (UNICEF) United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund. (2014). Every Child’s Birth Right: Inequities and Trends in Birth Registration. New York: UNICEF.Google Scholar
  69. United Nations Statistics Division. (2013). 2010 World Population and Housing Census Programme (2005–2014). Newsletter, 14 (March). Google Scholar
  70. van de Kaa, D.J. (1996). Anchored Narratives: The Story and Findings of Half a Century of Research into the Determinants of Fertility. Population Studies, 50 (3), 389–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Vance, R.B. (1952). Is Theory for Demographers? Social Forces, 31 (1), 9–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Westoff, C.F., Potter, J., and Sagi, P. (1963). The Third Child: A Study in the Prediction of Fertility. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Westoff, C.F., Potter, J., Sagi, P. and Mishler, E.G. (1961). Family Growth in Metropolitan America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Yusuf, F., Martins, J. M., and Swanson, D. A. (2014). Methods of Demographic Analysis. New York, NY: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department SociologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Division of AIDS, Behavioral, and Population SciencesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations