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Introduction

  • Marie-Luisa FrickEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter outlines the aims of the book, its methodology and locates its approach within the current state of research. It introduces key theoretical premises and lays out the distinction vital to the whole book, i.e., between the idea of human rights on the one hand side and human rights understood as lists of rights on the other. The central assumption here is that the idea of human rights consists of two pillars, i.e., universalism (the equality dimension of human rights) and individualism (the liberty dimension of human rights). In a next step, this chapter addresses the disputed question of human rights’ universality by proposing a new “testing model.” It enables the determination of different degrees of universality once the two pillars of the idea of human rights are erected on various ideological/cultural/religious grounds.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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