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Latin America Since the 1990s: Deindustrialization, Reprimarization and Policy Space Restrictions

  • José Miguel Ahumada
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the evolution of Latin America’s integration into the world economy since the 1980s from a structuralist perspective. It describes the different moments of the region’s insertion: the lost decade and the implementation of the liberalization agenda during the eighties, the nineties and the export turn of the region together with the wave of trade agreements with core countries and the impact of the commodity boom on the region’s productive structure. It concludes that the region is facing a growth regime that is based on an extractive and a low-value added export basket, a deep deindustrialization and restricted policy space for the states to implement pro-developmental policies.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Miguel Ahumada
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Politics and GovernmentAlberto Hurtado UniversitySantiagoChile
  2. 2.Institute of International StudiesUniversity of ChileSantiagoChile

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