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Diplomacy on the Multilateral Level: Human Rights and the Atomic Program

  • Magdalena Lisińska
Chapter

Abstract

The chapter is dedicated to Argentina’s foreign policy activity in response to the growing international interest in the military regime, particularly during the Democratic presidency of Jimmy Carter in the United States. The decisions taken by the ruling military are discussed in relation to international organizations and their bodies, as well as the United States. The first part of the chapter is devoted to the international response to human rights violations of the military regime and visit of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Argentina in 1979. The second part contains an analysis of the Argentine atomic program in the context of pressure to join the international nuclear non-proliferation treaties.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magdalena Lisińska
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Political Science and International RelationsJagiellonian UniversityKrakówPoland

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