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A High-Speed Large-Capacity Packet Buffer Scheme for High-Bandwidth Switches and Routers

  • Ling Zheng
  • Zhiliang Qiu
  • Weitao PanEmail author
  • Ya Gao
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering book series (LNICST, volume 262)

Abstract

Today’s switches and routers require high-speed and large-capacity packet buffers to guarantee a line rate up to 100 Gbps as well as more fine-grained quality of service. For this, this paper proposes an efficient parallel hybrid SRAM/DRAM architecture for high-bandwidth switches and routers. Tail SRAM and head SRAM are used for guaranteeing the middle DRAMs are accessed in a larger granularity to improve the bandwidth utilization. Then, a simple yet efficient memory management algorithm is designed. The memory space is dynamically allocated when a flow arrives, and a hard timeout is assigned for each queue. Hence, the SRAM space is utilized more efficiently. A queueing system is used to model the proposed method, and theoretical analysis is performed to optimize the timeout value. Simulation shows that the proposed architecture can reduce packet loss rate significantly compared with previous solutions with the same SRAM capacity.

Keywords

Switching system Packet buffer SRAM DRAM Queueing system 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the project of Science and Technology on Information Transmission and Dissemination in Communication Networks Laboratory (KX152600010/ITD-U15001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61502204, 61306047), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (JB140112), and the Qing Lan Project of Jiangsu.

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Copyright information

© ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Integrated Services NetworksXidian UniversityXi’anChina
  2. 2.School of Internet of Things TechnologyWuxi Institute of TechnologyWuxiChina

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