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New Laue Micro-diffraction Setup for Real-Time In Situ Microstructural Characterization of Materials Under External Stress

  • D. PopovEmail author
  • S. Sinogeikin
  • C. Park
  • E. Rod
  • J. Smith
  • R. Ferry
  • C. Kenney-Benson
  • N. Velisavljevic
  • G. Shen
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Laue X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful probe to characterize pressure-/strain-induced microstructural changes in materials. The use of brilliant synchrotron radiation allows Laue XRD to be measured in a fast manner, leading to microstructural characterization, such as two-dimensional maps of single-crystals, their texture, and deformation, to be made in time-resolved mode with temporal resolution down to seconds. This technique can be very efficient in the studies of mechanisms of deformation, grain growth, recrystallization, and phase transitions. A progress has been obtained to extend application of Laue diffraction to high-pressure area. Recent case studies of α → β transition in Si and α → ω transitions in Zr are briefly reported. A new experimental setup specifically optimized for real-time in situ Laue measurements has been developed at the 16-BMB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Due to the large X-ray energy range, which is typically up to 70 keV, a polychromatic beam diffraction technique can be efficiently implemented despite some limits introduced to the scattering angle by strain generation devices. Currently, the X-ray beam is focused at the sample position down to ~2.2 × 2.2 μm2 at the full width at the half maximum. Precision sample translation stages provide fast data collection with step sizes down to 0.5 μm.

Keywords

Laue diffraction Microstructure High pressure Synchrotron radiation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the support of a DOE-BES grant under Award No. DEFG02-99ER45775 for this work, performed at HP-CAT (Sector 16), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. HP-CAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA’s Office of Experimental Sciences. The Advanced Photon Source is a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is operated by LANS, LLC for the DOE-NNSA under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. The authors acknowledge funding support from LANL Science Programs 1 and 2.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Popov
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. Sinogeikin
    • 2
  • C. Park
    • 1
  • E. Rod
    • 1
  • J. Smith
    • 1
  • R. Ferry
    • 1
  • C. Kenney-Benson
    • 1
  • N. Velisavljevic
    • 3
  • G. Shen
    • 1
  1. 1.X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National LaboratoryHP-CATArgonneUSA
  2. 2.DAC Tools LLCNapervilleUSA
  3. 3.Shock and Detonation Physics Group, Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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