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Philosophical Principles of Data Discovery

  • Quan WuEmail author
  • Min Liu
  • Juanying Sun
  • Weijie Jiao
  • Shuanghua Tao
  • Xiaochen Li
  • Xue Han
  • Lijuan Jia
Conference paper
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 545)

Abstract

Data discovery is a basis in science and technology research because of nothing to do in case of no data. So, it is very important to find data. Where is the data? Data exists in the research objects which include material and consciousness in Philosophy. The world is material and motion is the fundamental attribute of matter. Therefore, things, as study objects, are always moving and changing. Data is description of the attributes of things which exist in a relatively static situation or absolute motion mode. The discovery of data is not only to observe the static state of the object, but also to study the state of motion of things. Sometimes it is necessary to let objects move. Time and space are the basic existence forms of things. Therefore, it is advisable to explore the things’ attributes from two dimensions of time and space. Timing data is the description of the relative static state of objects on every time node in the process of moving along the time axis. According to the research needs or experience, the time nodes in the timing data are artificially set. Physical shape is the representation of things in the motion process along the space axis. Things may behave differently in different forms. The data describing the different performance can be called Situation Data. This paper introduces Qinghai Lake and a place in Three River Plain in China through presenting their timing data and situation data.

Keywords

Data discovery Philosophy Material Thing Timing data Situation data Time Space Motion Time node Virtual reality RS 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This paper is supported by Innovation Team of Crop Monitoring by RS (CMIT), authorized by Chinese Academy of Agricultural Engineering (CAAE), in 2016. Meanwhile, the paper is also supported by National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFB0501505).

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Quan Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Min Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Juanying Sun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Weijie Jiao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shuanghua Tao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaochen Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xue Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lijuan Jia
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Cultivated Land UseMinistry of AgricultureBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Chinese Academy of Agricultural EngineeringBeijingChina

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