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The Polish Parliament and the Scrutiny of Brexit in Poland

  • Karolina Borońska-Hryniewiecka
Chapter
Part of the European Administrative Governance book series (EAGOV)

Abstract

Poland faces with Brexit the loss of one of its most important political and economic partners in the European Union (EU). Poland has had a trade surplus in goods and services with the United Kingdom (UK), with the latter also being the top destination of Polish emigration and constituting one of the biggest net contributors to the EU budget of which Poland is so far the largest recipient. Moreover, both countries have usually shared similar visions of the Single Market and the future direction of European integration. For this reason, the Polish government considers the negotiation of the UK withdrawal from the EU as well as forging the new UK-EU relationship as crucial processes for its national interests. The aim of this chapter is to account for the role of the Polish parliament in these procedures. The analysis of actual parliamentary engagement in the oversight of Brexit negotiations reveals that its role in the process is limited to mere monitoring and receipt of governmental information, despite the parliament’s fairly strong scrutiny powers in EU affairs. While the members of parliament are not able to influence the process by mandating the executive, the level of politicization of Brexit in the parliamentary arena is quite high, with the governing and opposition parties exploiting the topic for their own political gains.

Keywords

Polish Sejm Polish Senate European Union Parliamentary scrutiny Brexit 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karolina Borońska-Hryniewiecka
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Political Science, University of WrocławWrocławPoland

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