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Introduction

  • Thomas ChristiansenEmail author
  • Diane Fromage
Chapter
Part of the European Administrative Governance book series (EAGOV)

Abstract

This introductory chapter aims at setting the background of the analyses presented in the chapters of this edited volume. It explains in which context Brexit has intervened, and why it has been such an important issue for the British Parliament, as well as for the European Parliament and the parliaments of the other European Union member states. Citizens’ participation is examined too. It also draws general conclusions as to the impact of Brexit on parliamentary democracy, and parliaments’ participation in EU affairs.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Arts and Social SciencesMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Faculty of LawMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands

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