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Gravitational-Wave Astronomy by Precision Laser Interferometry

  • Norikatsu MioEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Chemical Physics book series (CHEMICAL, volume 119)

Abstract

Gravitational waves are the waves of gravitational interaction, which were predicted by Einstein’s theory of general relativity. One hundred years after the theoretical prediction, in February 2016, the US LIGO (laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) project reported that LIGO had detected a gravitational wave occurring at the coalescence of a black hole binary. Furthermore, the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2017 was awarded to three American physicists who made an outstanding contribution to the LIGO project. Since then, six gravitational wave events have been observed during two observation periods. Moreover, astronomy combined with the observation of electromagnetic waves in a wide wavelength range from radio waves to gamma rays is beginning. In this chapter we will outline the fundamental nature of gravitational waves, their detection method, and this new astronomy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Photon Science and TechnologyUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-kuJapan

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