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Seminal VOCs Analysis Investigating Sperm Quality Decline—New Studies to Improve Male Fertility Contrasting Population Ageing

  • Valentina LongoEmail author
  • Angiola Forleo
  • Sara Pinto Provenzano
  • Lamberto Coppola
  • Vincenzo Zara
  • Alessandra Ferramosca
  • Pietro Siciliano
  • Simonetta Capone
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 544)

Abstract

The world is impacting with a drastic demographic change that is reflected in a progressive ageing population. If on the one side increasing health care for older people is important, stimulating the level of birth becomes decisive. The principal goal of this work is to set up of new method for early diagnosis of male infertility based on analysis of seminal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), potentially biomarkers of infertility status. The identification of the volatile metabolite patterns in semen samples was done by an unconventional GC/[−MS + gas sensor] system. Once validate this approach could integrate and improve traditional semen analysis based on physiological parameters and addressed to the development of novel medical devices based on gas microsensors for male infertility screening.

Keywords

Population ageing Male infertility Semen volatile organic compounds GC-MS Gas sensors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valentina Longo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Angiola Forleo
    • 1
  • Sara Pinto Provenzano
    • 2
  • Lamberto Coppola
    • 2
  • Vincenzo Zara
    • 3
  • Alessandra Ferramosca
    • 3
  • Pietro Siciliano
    • 1
  • Simonetta Capone
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM)LecceItaly
  2. 2.Biological Medical Center “Tecnomed”LecceItaly
  3. 3.Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences and TechnologiesUniversity of SalentoLecceItaly

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