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Geoconservation, Geotourism and Sustainable Development in the Galapagos

  • Daniel KelleyEmail author
  • Kevin Page
  • Diego Quiroga
  • Raul Salazar
Chapter
Part of the Geoheritage, Geoparks and Geotourism book series (GGAG)

Abstract

The concept of nature experienced an important shift from the 19th into the early 20th century as people started to conceive conservation as a scientific and even professional endeavor. The tradition of finding truth by observing nature and developing explanations of its workings, which had existed in Western European cultures since the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle’s time (4th Century BC,) became later an important aspect of modernity. However, modern views have become increasingly mechanistic in their understanding, leading to a disenchantment with nature (Botkin in The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: discordant harmonies reconsidered. Oxford University Press, 2012).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Kelley
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kevin Page
    • 2
  • Diego Quiroga
    • 3
  • Raul Salazar
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Natural ResourcesHocking CollegeNelsonvilleUSA
  2. 2.Geodiversity & HeritageSandford, DevonUK
  3. 3.Universidad San Francisco de QuitoCumbayaEcuador
  4. 4.Biological Expeditions GalapagosPuerto Baquerizo MorenoEcuador

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