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Post-War Expansion

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
Chapter
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 17)

Abstract

In this chapter the narrative addresses that post-war period in Australian history in the development of Australian universities. Governments began to take more interest in the workings and financial needs of universities. Governments were also dealing with the reconstruction phases after World War II, as well as the need for an increased population. This increased population came from the huge migration program starting from 1947, largely from war-torn Europe. Several government-commissioned reports highlighted the challenges for the expansion of higher education; how many new universities should be built, what they would teach and the need to avoid duplication of courses. Languages were part of this narrative as additional languages were introduced but the need for rationalisation often voiced. The changing nature of Australian demographics brought issues of the settlement of migrants and their welfare needs, and the place of their languages in Australia society.

Keywords

Post-war expansion of universities Migrant languages Asian languages Language reports Government control of universities Funding of universities A national policy on languages 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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