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Introduction

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
Chapter
Part of the Language Policy book series (LAPO, volume 17)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the key themes of the book. The foundations of tertiary language teaching are explored, along with the evolving policies of governments towards languages. The chapter introduces four themes: the national interest, the changing demographics of the Australian population, Australia’s relationship with Asia in terms of trade and security and the growing importance of Asian languages for Australia. International influences are discussed as is the international education sector. A series of language reports are signposts through the twentieth and twentieth-first centuries. The research for this book has drawn on many universities’ histories as well as interviews with those who were part of the narrative of languages teaching in the era covered by the book. A summary of each chapter seeks to enable the reader to understand how the political and academic influences have shaped the history of tertiary languages teaching.

Keywords

Language policies Languages history Tertiary education Multiculturalism Australian history International influences 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer Joan Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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