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Local Interests and Social Integration in Europe

Integrating the Member States Under the European Pillar of Social Rights?
  • Sára HunglerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

One of the declared aims of the EU is to set up fair and well-functioning labour markets with the ultimate goal of creating better-performing economies and more equitable societies in Europe. The EU’s intervention is, however, grossly delimited by the competences and the autonomy retained by the Member States in the social domain as well as by the closely protected prerogative of the Member States to define the fundamental principles of the national system of social protection. Integration in the social field is also inhibited by the diversity of the institutional setups of local socio-economic models (capitalisms), which prevents institutional convergence among the Member States. In this light, social integration in the EU, especially when designed to be implemented through binding legal regulation, faces considerable difficulties, which raises doubts about the level of integration achievable. This may well be particularly true for the recent initiative to revive the social dimension of European integration under the European Pillar of Social Rights, which in the light of previous experiences has to overcome fundamental divergences of interests in the different Member States.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Centre for Social SciencesELTE University, Faculty of LawBudapestHungary

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