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Introduction: Big History Context

  • Julia Zinkina
  • David Christian
  • Leonid Grinin
  • Ilya Ilyin
  • Alexey Andreev
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
  • Sergey Shulgin
  • Andrey Korotayev
Chapter
Part of the World-Systems Evolution and Global Futures book series (WSEGF)

Abstract

This book on globalization sets its theme within the framework of deep time—without hesitation and on the largest possible scales. It asks, in effect, what “globalization” looks like if you ask your question within the framework of a universal history of humanity, the biosphere and even the cosmos. Why set the subject of globalization within such a broad conceptual and temporal framework? Is it really necessary to talk about the history of the universe in discussing a theme as modern as globalization? This introduction will suggest some of the ways in which such a broad framework can deepen and enrich our understanding of what we mean by globalization, and it will sketch out the big history framework within which we discuss globalization.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Zinkina
    • 1
  • David Christian
    • 2
  • Leonid Grinin
    • 3
  • Ilya Ilyin
    • 4
  • Alexey Andreev
    • 4
  • Ivan Aleshkovski
    • 5
  • Sergey Shulgin
    • 1
  • Andrey Korotayev
    • 3
  1. 1.Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public AdministrationMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Higher School of EconomicsNational Research UniversityMoscowRussia
  4. 4.Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Faculty of Global StudiesMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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