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Numerical Investigation of Magneto-hydrodynamics in a Magnetic Peristaltic Pump

  • Faizah OsmanEmail author
  • Muhamad Husaini Abu Bakar
Chapter
Part of the Advanced Structured Materials book series (STRUCTMAT, volume 102)

Abstract

This paper presents a finite element analysis and a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for a magnetic peristaltic pump. In this paper, we attempted to summarise the most important results, and the purpose of this study is to establish ideas on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in flows of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid containing inside the tube of a magnetic peristaltic pump. A finite element method magnetics (FEMM) analysis was used as a tool to design the geometry in order to determine the magnetic fields occurred due to the different currents applied to the magnetic peristaltic pump. Moreover, the purpose of this study is to develop a numerical tool that is able to simulate MR fluid flow and determine the effect of the applied magnetic field effect on the flow velocities by using the Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) software. The uniform transverse external magnetic fields are applied perpendicular to the flow direction. It was observed that an increase in the magnetic field leads to a decreased flow velocity. Results are obtained from the numerical study and are plotted graphically and disgusted in the present paper.

Keywords

Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) Magnetic peristaltic pump Magnetorheological (MR) fluid Magnetic fields effect Velocities 

Notes

Acknowledgements

All the experiment and analysis conducted under System Engineering and Energy Laboratory, Universiti Kuala Lumpur, Malaysian Spanish Institute, Kulim Kedah, Malaysia.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.System Engineering and Energy LaboratoryMalaysian Spanish Institute, Universiti Kuala LumpurKulimMalaysia

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