Advertisement

Microwave and Millimetre Wave Antipodal Vivaldi Antenna with Periodic Slit-Edge Technique and the Trapezoid-Shaped Dielectric Lens for Imaging of Concrete-Based Composite Materials

  • Mahdi Moosazadeh
Chapter

Abstract

A compact antipodal Vivaldi antenna (AVA) with high gain at low frequencies and front-to-back ratio, lower operating frequency (3.4 GHz) and wide operating bandwidth from 3.4 to 40 GHz is presented in this chapter. It includes periodic slit-edge technique and trapezoid-shaped dielectric lens as an extension of substrate. Applicability of the proposed AVA for UWB imaging of construction materials and structures for non-destructive testing and evaluation is demonstrated using three different samples including a concrete block with plasterboard sheets to highlight the high-range resolution of the proposed antenna. In the first sample, capability of the proposed antenna for the detection and evaluation of targets such as metal discs placed at different heights on foam substrate is demonstrated. In the second sample, a practical sample that is based on cubic concrete block was prepared and imaged. A groove was made on the top surface of the block and one steel rod was inserted in the groove. In the third sample, top of the cubic concrete block was covered by plasterboard sheets and an air gap was created by removing one sheet. Third sample had a cavity in a composite structure and imaging results are provided.

Keywords

Antipodal Vivaldi antenna Dielectric lens UWB High gain High front-to-back ratio High-range resolution Microwave and millimetre wave imaging Concrete block Air-gap Cavity Plasterboard sheet 

References

  1. Bai, J., Shi, S., & Prather, D. W. (2011). Modified compact antipodal Vivaldi antenna for 4–50-GHz UWB application. IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, 59, 1051–1057.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bourqui, J., Okoniewski, M., & Fear, E. C. (2010). Balanced antipodal Vivaldi antenna with dielectric director for near-field microwave imaging. IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 58, 2318–2326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Case, J. T., Ghasr, M. T., & Zoughi, R. (2011). Optimum two-dimensional uniform spatial sampling for microwave SAR-based NDE imaging systems. IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, 60, 3806–3815.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chuang, J.-K., Cheng, Y.-H., & Wang, C.-L. (2016). Compact and broadband microstrip-fed antenna using antisymmetric tapered probe with triangular element. In 2016 IEEE International Symposium on RadioFrequency Integration Technology (RFIT). IEEE, pp. 1–3.Google Scholar
  5. De Oliveira, A. M., Perotoni, M. B., Kofuji, S. T., & Justo, J. F. (2015). A palm tree antipodal Vivaldi antenna with exponential slot edge for improved radiation pattern. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 14, 1334–1337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fei, P., Jiao, Y.-C., Hu, W., & Zhang, F.-S. (2011). A miniaturized antipodal Vivaldi antenna with improved radiation characteristics. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 10, 127–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. In, D. M., Lee, M. J., Kim, D., Oh, C. Y., & Kim, Y. S. (2012). Antipodal linearly tapered slot antenna using unequal half-circular defected sides for gain improvements. Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, 54, 1963–1965.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Juan, L., Guang, F., Lin, Y., & Demin, F. (2013). A modified balanced antipodal Vivaldi antenna with improved radiation characteristics. Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, 55, 1321–1325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kota, K., & Shafai, L. (2011). Gain and radiation pattern enhancement of balanced antipodal Vivaldi antenna. Electronics Letters, 47, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Molaei, A., Kaboli, M., Mirtaheri, S. A., & Abrishamian, M. S. (2014). Dielectric lens balanced antipodal Vivaldi antenna with low cross-polarisation for ultra-wideband applications. IET Microwaves, Antennas and Propagation, 8, 1137–1142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Moosazadeh, M., & Kharkovsky, S. (2016). A compact high-gain and front-to-back ratio elliptically tapered antipodal Vivaldi antenna with trapezoid-shaped dielectric lens. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 15, 552–555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Moosazadeh, M., Kharkovsky, S., & Case, J. T. (2016). Microwave and millimetre wave antipodal Vivaldi antenna with trapezoid-shaped dielectric lens for imaging of construction materials. IET Microwaves, Antennas and Propagation, 10, 301–309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Pandey, G., Verma, H., & Meshram, M. (2015). Compact antipodal Vivaldi antenna for UWB applications. Electronics Letters, 51, 308–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Puskely, J., Lacik, J., Raida, Z., & Arthaber, H. (2016). High gain dielectric loaded Vivaldi antenna for Ka band applications. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 15, 2004–2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Schaubert, D. H., Kollberg, E. L., Korzeniowski, T. L., Thungren, T., Johansson, J., & Yngvesson, K. S. (1985). Endfire tapered slot antennas on dielectric substrates. IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 33, 1392–1400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Teni, G., Zhang, N., Qiu, J., & Zhang, P. (2013). Research on a novel miniaturized antipodal Vivaldi antenna with improved radiation. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 12, 417–420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Wang, P., Zhang, H., Wen, G., & Sun, Y. (2012). Design of modified 6-18 GHz balanced antipodal Vivaldi antenna. Progress in Electromagnetics Research C, 25, 271–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Wu, J., Zhao, Z., Nie, Z., & Liu, Q.-H. (2014). A printed UWB Vivaldi antenna using stepped connection structure between slot-line and tapered patches. IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, 13, 698–701.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahdi Moosazadeh
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Infrastructure Engineering, School of Computing, Engineering and MathematicsWestern Sydney UniversityPenrithAustralia

Personalised recommendations