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Conclusion: Governing Under the Condition of Complexity

  • Arthur BenzEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Comparative Territorial Politics book series (COMPTPOL)

Abstract

This chapter draws conclusions from what we have learned from research on multilevel governance. Starting from the institutional constraints caused by multiple linkages between levels of government and administration, executive-parliament relations and policy sectors, it will discuss the various ways actors can deal with these constraints. Some of the strategies aimed at avoiding conflicts or vetoes have negative effects for effectiveness or democratic legitimacy, while others, taking advantage of the institutional diversity and dynamics, facilitate reducing these consequences. Therefore, complexity of governance constrains and enables policy-making in a particular way, as is expected from liberal and democratic government. Managing this dilemma requires flexible structures and strategic actors. The resulting dynamics of MLG can either destabilize or restore a balance of power. While comparative research has discovered various patterns of coordination and policy-making in MLG and considered dynamics, there is still the need to refine the analytical categories and apply them in empirical research in order to better understand the mechanisms and conditions which make governance work in multilevel structures.

Keywords

Balance Complexity Governance Legitimacy Multilevel Rule 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Political ScienceTechnische Universität DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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