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Climate Change-Induced Loss and Damage of Freshwater Resources in Bangladesh

  • Nandan MukherjeeEmail author
  • John S. Rowan
  • Roufa Khanum
  • Ainun Nishat
  • Sajidur Rahman
Chapter
Part of the The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science book series (APESS, volume 28)

Abstract

Climate change loss and damage is evident in hydrological perturbations among river systems in Bangladesh. Significant disruptions include changes in the intensity, frequency, and seasonality of peak and low flow characteristics. Over the last few decades, water-related disasters conveyed through the river systems have caused increased economic damage of assets and infrastructure. Other impacts include the loss of fish spawning grounds and reduced agricultural production due to changes in the hydrological regime. This chapter discusses a broad range of generalised approaches to address water-related disasters and changes in hydrological characteristics.

Keywords

Climate change Loss and damage Hydrological alteration Riverine ecosystem 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nandan Mukherjee
    • 1
    Email author
  • John S. Rowan
    • 1
  • Roufa Khanum
    • 2
  • Ainun Nishat
    • 2
  • Sajidur Rahman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of DundeeDundeeScotland
  2. 2.Centre for Climate Change and Environmental Research, BRAC UniversityDhakaBangladesh

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