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“Between Heaven and Earth”: Space, Music, and Religion in The Rainbow

  • Susan ReidEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Music and Literature book series (PASTMULI)

Abstract

This chapter, “‘Between Heaven and Earth’: Space, Music, and Religion in The Rainbow”, examines Lawrence’s turn from the predominantly visual mode of Sons and Lovers to an acoustic model suggested by the analogy of Chladni patterns of sound waves in sand. A structure of widening circles (akin to sound waves) takes an opposite trajectory to Wagner’s retreat from the outside world in Parsifal (1881), while acoustic patterns of repetition and stasis at the level of language parallel contemporary musical innovations. Thomas Hardy, Debussy, and Schoenberg offered various models for negotiating a course between Romanticism and realism, spirituality and materialism, towards a modernism that brings together the putatively sacred and profane, with Schoenberg’s oratorio Die Jakobsleiter offering rich parallels with Lawrence’s idea of religious art.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Northampton NorthamptonNorthamptonshireUK

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