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Pacific Elementary School

  • Chan Lü
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the program on which the research projects described in the book were based. The goal is to contextualize the It began with a brief description of the history of the school, and of the Chinese immersion program. It also details the program’s policies on admission, language use and script use, its curriculum based on the 50-50 immersion program model, its teachers, and its assessment practices particularly in Chinese, its student outcome based on school-wide data, and parental involvement in the Chinese immersion program.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chan Lü
    • 1
  1. 1.Asian Languages and LiteratureUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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