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Explorations on the Nature of Resistance: Challenging Gender-Based Violence in the Academy

  • Ruth LewisEmail author
  • Sundari Anitha
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Gender and Education book series (GED)

Abstract

As awareness of and frustration with sexism in academia grows, so too do strategies of resistance. This chapter explores the concept of ‘resistance’ in relation to gender-based violence (GBV) in universities. In this context, ‘resistance’ includes work, much of it inspired by a feminist analysis, to prevent GBV, to hold institutions to account and to change university cultures so that they no longer invisibilise or condone GBV. Resistance to such efforts also comes from those who would support the status quo and those critical of the framing of anti-GBV campaigns. This chapter will explore how the ‘backlash’ against feminism and post-feminist equalisation discourses comprises types of resistance to radical attempts to eradicate this form of sexism in the academy.

Keywords

Feminist research Gender in higher education 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social Sciences and MediaNorthumbria UniversityNewcastleUK
  2. 2.School of Social and Political SciencesUniversity of LincolnLincolnUK

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