Advertisement

Civic Engagement as Empowerment: Theater, Public Art, and Spoken Word as Roads to Activism

  • Kay SieblerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Gender and Education book series (GED)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the use of student-authored or previously published poetry and theater to engage students in feminist political and social activisms. The border-crossing of academic work/research with public performance allows for student empowerment and civic engagement. Performance becomes a way students participate in political conversation and feminist action. Moreover, performance venues give voice to traditionally marginalized students, crosses borders between identities and communities, and create a sense of agency and empowerment—especially for female and other traditionally marginalized people—that is often difficult to achieve in more traditional curriculum.

Keywords

Feminist pedagogy Cross-disciplinary Civic engagement Political activism Service learning 

References

  1. Astin, A. W. (1993). What matters in college? Four critical years revisited. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  2. Biddix, J., Somers, P., & Polman, J. (2009). Protest reconsideration: Identifying democratic and civic engagement in learning outcomes. Innovations in Higher Education, 34, 133–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bishop, C. (2006). Participation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bowman, N. A., Park, J. J., & Denson, N. (2015). Student involvement in ethnic student organizations: Examining civic outcomes 6 years after graduation. Research in Higher Education, 56, 127–145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chambers, T., & Phelps, C. E. (1993). Student activism as a form of leadership and student development. NASPA Journal, 3(1), 19–29.Google Scholar
  6. Colby, A., Beaumont, E., Ehrich, T., & Corngold, J. (2010). Educating for democracy: Preparing undergraduates for responsible political engagement. Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  7. Colby, A., Ehrlich, T., Beaumont, E., & Stephens, J. (2007). Educating citizens: Preparing America’s undergraduates for lives of moral and civic responsibility. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  8. Dookhoo, S. (2015). How Millennials engage in social media activism: A uses and gratifications approach. Masters theses, University of Central Florida. https://stars.library.ucf.edu/etd/1364.
  9. Ehrlich, T. (2000). Civic responsibility and higher education. Phoenix, AZ: Orynx Press.Google Scholar
  10. File, T. (2017, May 10). Voting in America. United States Census Bureau. https://www.census.gov/newsroom/blogs/random-samplings/2017/05/voting_in_america.html. Last accessed June 2018.
  11. Fine, G. A. (1995). Public narration and group culture: Discerning discourse in social movements. In J. Johnston & B. Klandermans (Eds.), Social movements and culture (pp. 127–143). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  12. Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.Google Scholar
  13. Giroux, H. A. (2002). Neoliberalism, corporate Culture, and the promise of higher education: The university as a democratic public sphere. Harvard Educational Review, 72(4), 425–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gottfried, J., Barthel, M., Shearer, E., & Mitchell, A. (2016, February 4). The 2016 presidential campaign. Pew Research Center. http://www.journalism.org/2016/02/04/the-2016-presidential-campaign-a-news-event-thats-hard-to-miss/. Last accessed June 2018.
  15. Hartley, M. (2009). Reclaiming the democratic purposes of American higher education: Tracing the trajectory of the civic engagement movement. Learning and Teaching, 2(3), 11–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Educating as the practice of freedom. New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Hunter, D. E. (1988). Student activism: Growth through rebellion. In K. M. Miser (Ed.), Student affairs and campus dissent: Reflection of the past and challenge for the future (pp. 23–40). Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.Google Scholar
  18. Jacoby, B. (2009). Civic engagement in today’s higher education: An overview. In B. Jacoby (Ed.), Civic engagement in higher education: Concepts and practices (pp. 5–30). Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Kane, A. E. (1997). Theorizing meaning construction in social movements: Symbolic structures and interpretation during the Irish Land War, 1879–1882. Sociological Theory, 15(3), 249–276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Keeling, R. P. (Ed.). (2004). Learning reconsidered: A campus-wide focus on the student experience. Washington, DC: The National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, The American College Personnel Association.Google Scholar
  21. Musil, C. M. (2011). Remapping education for social responsibility: Civic, local, and global diversity. In B. Jacoby (Ed.), Civic engagement in higher education: Concepts and practices (pp. 49–68). Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Naples, N. A., & Bohar, K. (Eds.). (2002). Teaching feminist activism: Strategies from the field. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  23. Newman, J. H. (1990). Idea of a University. University of Notre Dame Press (Original work published in 1852).Google Scholar
  24. Orr, C. (2011). Women’s studies as civic engagement: Research and recommendations. The Teagle Working Group on Women’s Studies and Civic Engagement and the National Women’s Studies Association. http://www.nwsa.org/Files/Resources/WomensStudiesasCivicEngagement2011Revised_Finalpdf-1.pdf. Last accessed June 2018.
  25. Schultz, K. (2017, March 6). What calling Congress achieves. The New Yorker. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/06/what-calling-congress-achieves. Last accessed June 2018.
  26. Schutte, J. (2017). The future of student life: Participating. On the Horizon, 25(3), 177–180. https://ezproxy.missouriwestern.edu:6835/10.1108/OTH-05-2017-0025.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Siebler, K. (2004). Composing feminisms. New Jersey, NJ: Hampton Press.Google Scholar
  28. Springgay, S. (2010). Knitting as an aesthetic of civic engagement: Re-conceptualizing feminist pedagogy through touch. Feminist Teacher, 20(2), 111–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Strachan, J., Hildreth, A., & Murray, L. (2002). In search of effective civic education messages: A content analysis of high school government texts. Conference Papers—American Political Science Association, 1–40.Google Scholar
  30. Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  31. Welch, M. (2009). Moving from service-learning to civic engagement. In B. Jacoby (Ed.), Civic engagement in higher education: Concepts and practices (pp. 174–195). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  32. Yerbury, H., & Burridge, N. (2013). The activist professional: Advocacy and scholarship. Third Sector Review, 19(2 Special), 119–134.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Missouri Western State UniversitySt. JosephUSA

Personalised recommendations