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Launching the DRC: Historical Context and Future Directions

  • Thomas E. DrabekEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Hazards book series (ENHA)

Abstract

This chapter describes the historical context within which the Disaster Research Center at The Ohio State University began in 1963, both what came before and major issues confronted during the early years. Future directions in disaster research are then described. Key areas for the future research agenda include both basic theoretical issues and specific areas of inquiry reflecting paradigm shifts and emergent cultural and social changes.

Keywords

Disaster Research Center Emergency management Disaster research theory Research methods 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and CriminologyUniversity of DenverDenverUSA

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