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PWSCC Susceptibility of Alloy 690, 52 and 152

  • Takaharu MaeguchiEmail author
  • Kimihisa Sakima
  • Kenji Sato
  • Koji Fujimoto
  • Yasuto Nagoshi
  • Kazuya Tsutsumi
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Long-term constant load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing for alloys 690/152/52 at 360 ℃ is ongoing, showing no rupture for more than 105 h, suggesting immunity to primary water (PW) SCC initiation under stress level assumed for primary circuit components in pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. Since the mechanical plug for steam generators has the largest cold work strain, a mock-up PWSCC test, using a mechanical plug of alloy 690, was also performed for evaluation of time to failure under stress and cold work conditions assumed for operating plan. As a result, it was proven that no crack initiated up to approximately 4 × 104 h at 360 ℃. PWSCC susceptibility was also evaluated in terms of crack growth rate (CGR). The CGR of alloy 690 increased after cold working, and the degree of increment is significantly affected by the nature of carbide precipitate along grain boundaries. It was found that increase in CGR caused by cold working remained relatively low when grain boundary carbides precipitated continuously along grain boundaries and coherently with the matrix. Contrarily, CGR grew higher in the materials with lower coherency. It was also revealed that alloy 690 with no grain boundary carbides (solution annealed alloy) showed a small increase of CGR after cold working.

Keywords

Stress corrosion cracking PWSCC Alloy 690 Alloy Alloy 52 Crack growth rate 

Notes

Acknowledgements

A part of this work was performed as a joint research program supported by The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc, The Japan Atomic Power Company, Shikoku Electric Power Co. Inc. and Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takaharu Maeguchi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kimihisa Sakima
    • 1
  • Kenji Sato
    • 1
  • Koji Fujimoto
    • 1
  • Yasuto Nagoshi
    • 2
  • Kazuya Tsutsumi
    • 2
  1. 1.Research and Innovation Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.TakasagoJapan
  2. 2.Nuclear Energy Systems DivisionPower Systems, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LtdHyogo-Ku, KobeJapan

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