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Using Modern Microscopy to “Fingerprint” Secondary Side SCC in Ni–Fe Alloys

  • S. Y. PersaudEmail author
  • J. M. Smith
  • C. D. Judge
  • M. Bryk
  • R. C. Newman
  • M. G. Burke
  • I. de Curieres
  • B. M. Capell
  • M. D. Wright
Conference paper
Part of the The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series book series (MMMS)

Abstract

Aggressive aqueous environments (Pb, S, pH extremes) used in laboratory tests have been shown to induce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Ni–Fe–Cr alloys. These conditions are used to simulate the extremes of secondary side crevice environments that are unlikely to occur under normal operating conditions but laboratory testing can still be used to establish sensitivities to abnormal chemistry conditions. Advances in modern microscopy have enabled the characterization of these secondary-side SCC systems at near-atomic resolution, helping to reveal mechanistic characteristics unique to each SCC mode. International progress investigating secondary-side SCC phenomena using analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is reviewed in this paper. The unique chemistry and degradation associated with different modes of SCC are identified and compared among Ni–Fe–Cr steam generator tube alloys of interest (Alloy 690 and Alloy 800). It is revealed that each SCC mode exhibits distinctive characteristics, or a “fingerprint”, which can be used to identify the aggressive environment responsible for inducing SCC.

Keywords

Stress corrosion cracking Transmission electron microscopy Nickel alloys Secondary side PbSCC Sulfur-assisted cracking 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Steam Generator Integrity (SGI) program, the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for providing funding for different portions of this work. TEM analysis was skillfully carried out at the Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy (CCEM), the AREVA Technical Center, and Fibics Inc. The APT analysis was carried out by Dr. Brian Langelier and the APT system used in this work was funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation as part of the Centre for Advanced Nuclear Systems.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Y. Persaud
    • 1
    Email author
  • J. M. Smith
    • 1
  • C. D. Judge
    • 1
  • M. Bryk
    • 2
  • R. C. Newman
    • 2
  • M. G. Burke
    • 3
  • I. de Curieres
    • 4
  • B. M. Capell
    • 5
  • M. D. Wright
    • 1
  1. 1.Canadian Nuclear LaboratoriesChalk RiverCanada
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied ChemistryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Materials Performance Centre, University of ManchesterManchesterUK
  4. 4.IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté NucléaireFontenay-aux-RosesFrance
  5. 5.Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)CharlotteUSA

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